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Upstart - Age Before Beauty: Success and the Older Developer

    General discussion

  • In the technology industry, with every additional year of experience, it’s easy to feel that your employability diminishes. I’ve found a few tricks that have been effective for software engineers.

    Read this article in the February 2017 issue of MSDN Magazine

    Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:34 PM
    Owner

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  • This article is quite possibly the most useless, patronizing and negative thing I've read on MSDN.  Is the author really suggesting that we hide our experience for the sake of being hired by an ageist company?  I think an interviewer is going to figure out that I'm "experienced" when I sit down with them.  Instead of telling people how to conceal experience on their resume, maybe the author should be telling people how to sell their experience.  
    Saturday, February 04, 2017 7:43 PM
  • Author has point. In a context one must read. All aged IT professional does not have extraordinary career, they are just looking for coding jobs.  

    A common mistake made by aged coders competing with young, is trying to prove again after so many years, so resume goes pages and pages long. Generally companies are interested in what you can do at present for them. Your credibility is already proven by your existence in this dynamic industry for so long.

    All interviews are concluded in 15 minutes max (most interviewer makes up their mind in early stage itself). All resume are shortlisted in 30 seconds to 1 minute max. Therefore, all that the Author is asking the Aged coder is not to get emotional about long years. But be focused on what the job is.

    However I will agree with Daniel if one is trying for the Top job. Those resumes are completely different. 



    Friday, February 17, 2017 1:05 PM
  • I agree, I can easily keep-up with most young programmers. Most young programmers can't write quality code. They slap it together and brag how quickly they wrote it, then move on. Many young programmers have no understanding of design, maintainability, cost. Many have never had to design a small application or database schema let alone a modern enterprise application. An experience and passionate developer may take longer to build it, but it will have less bugs and be easier to enhance later. I will never hide my age, if they are too cheap or discriminate on age, it's their loss, and I probably don't want the job anyway.

    I would also note number of years is not a perfect indicator of experience, many developers just don't care about their trade and don't try to improve, it's just a job.

    If you are lucky enough to interview an experienced and passionate developer in his 40's, you better snatch him up, because someone smarter than you will...


    Eric

    Wednesday, March 01, 2017 12:02 AM
  • Agreed. Especially these:

    [quote]

    I will never hide my age, if they are too cheap or discriminate on age, it's their loss, and I probably don't want the job anyway.

    I would also note number of years is not a perfect indicator of experience, many developers just don't care about their trade and don't try to improve, it's just a job.

    [/quote]

    It's not about how many years of experience. It's about whether you have 10+ years of experience or 10+ times of 1 year experience.

    Some people will never learn and have no improvement in their skill over their career at some point. The key is to show you keep improving. It's a career which those who can't grow are dead. :P

    Generally, I consider listing experience on multiple generations of technology will prove you have no problem to defeat the inertia commonly built.

    Monday, March 06, 2017 9:13 AM
  • Old age and treachery always overcomes youth and enthusiasm.
    Friday, May 05, 2017 7:45 PM