none
Windows 8 Connected Standby RRS feed

  • Question

  • Has anyone been able to use connected standby on any existing hardware that is on the market? Or do I have to wait till officially supported Windows 8 hardware is released later in the year?
    Wednesday, April 4, 2012 12:53 PM

Answers

  • The kernel simply doesn't schedule threads belonging to desktop applications when the system is in Connected Standby.

    Therefore, you can roughly approximate Connected Standby by using Sysinternals Process Explorer to suspend your process.  (Right-click on the process name, select Suspend from the context menu).

    In contrast to desktop applications, NT services (i.e., something running in session 0) will have CPU usage throttled.  You can (very!) roughly approximate this in Process Explorer by alternately suspending and resuming the service host process.  We are still tuning the algorithms, but as a  rough hint of the direction we're aiming, you can imagine that a service will be suspended 90% of the time, and will be periodically resumed  in short 1-second bursts.   (Of course, if the service's threads are in a wait state [e.g., because they're waiting on an idle socket], then they still won't get scheduled on the CPU.  Being un-suspended only means that the threads are allowed to run if they want to.)

    But generally we don't expect users to install many 3rd-party NT services on AOAC platforms  --  remember that these are highly-mobile form factors, like tablets.   Most people don't want to run a web server on their tablet.

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 8:00 PM
  • you will have to wait until win8 certified hardware is out

    d -- This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4:50 PM
  • Microsoft is testing this with pre production hardware and firmware provided by the vendors.  when it goes into production, you should be able to buy such hardware. but as a metro application, connected standby should be pretty transparent to you.

    d -- This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, April 10, 2012 4:29 PM

All replies

  • you will have to wait until win8 certified hardware is out

    d -- This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Wednesday, April 4, 2012 4:50 PM
  • As currently there is no win8 certified hardware available how is Microsoft testing connected standby? Is there any way in which I can reproduce this testing system, possible by creating a Hyper-V image with a specific configuration that would enable me to test how my application acts under connected standby.
    Tuesday, April 10, 2012 10:37 AM
  • Microsoft is testing this with pre production hardware and firmware provided by the vendors.  when it goes into production, you should be able to buy such hardware. but as a metro application, connected standby should be pretty transparent to you.

    d -- This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, April 10, 2012 4:29 PM
  • Thanks for the response. I'm not too concerned about how a metro application acts during connected standby, as I think I have got my head around that.  The concern is how my desktop application would respond to connected standby and it's services being throttled to reduce the impact on battery life of the machine. Is there any method in which I would be able to replicate this throttling in the same way that connected standby would? 
    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 8:54 AM
  • The kernel simply doesn't schedule threads belonging to desktop applications when the system is in Connected Standby.

    Therefore, you can roughly approximate Connected Standby by using Sysinternals Process Explorer to suspend your process.  (Right-click on the process name, select Suspend from the context menu).

    In contrast to desktop applications, NT services (i.e., something running in session 0) will have CPU usage throttled.  You can (very!) roughly approximate this in Process Explorer by alternately suspending and resuming the service host process.  We are still tuning the algorithms, but as a  rough hint of the direction we're aiming, you can imagine that a service will be suspended 90% of the time, and will be periodically resumed  in short 1-second bursts.   (Of course, if the service's threads are in a wait state [e.g., because they're waiting on an idle socket], then they still won't get scheduled on the CPU.  Being un-suspended only means that the threads are allowed to run if they want to.)

    But generally we don't expect users to install many 3rd-party NT services on AOAC platforms  --  remember that these are highly-mobile form factors, like tablets.   Most people don't want to run a web server on their tablet.

    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 8:00 PM