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Signing Windows system driver for Windows 10 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have created an Azure account and logged in according to the recommendation of posts found through search, but cannot find any of the links described in support posts about how to submit my driver for approval.

    In fact most help topics mention start by creating an admin account, but where?

    The Azure portal provides no useful links or leads.

    Please advise.

    Thursday, November 29, 2018 2:14 AM

Answers

  • This was quite a mystery but I got it solved.

    I spent over on the phone with Microsoft yesterday and they found that there was a glitch in the web software that would put me in an endless loop, never allowing me to get to the right place on the website. The glitch was triggered by me having an old account that was registered as a Microsoft "personal" account (for Office 365) rather than a Microsoft work account. Even though both accounts were under the same email address, the web software would never present the choice, but rather send me to the personal account every time. Microsoft personal accounts do not allow code signing so this resulted in the endless loop trying to get to the screen for submitting the file.

    So yeah, it was there, but I couldn't get to it. The work-around was to change the email address of the old account.  The Microsoft support guy was very sharp in spotting the problem. We had a remote session going and he noticed the URL was not right for the driver signing stuff.

    Thanks for your help.

    Friday, April 5, 2019 4:20 PM

All replies

  • From elsewhere...

    According Driver Signing changes in Windows 10 said, all new Windows 10 kernel mode drivers must be submitted to and digitally signed by the Windows Hardware Developer Center Dashboard portal.  Windows 10 will not load new kernel mode drivers which are not signed by the portal.

    That link looks like the best advice so far, but from there there is no useful help or anything that looks related. For example am I supposed to guess that I need to then sign up as a developer and pay $100 fee or what? Are there hidden fees later for submitting my driver?

    Some specific instructions posted anywhere would be a great help.

    Thursday, November 29, 2018 11:52 PM
  • I am having the same problem as the OP. I get to Azure and find nothing for submitting kernel-mode drivers for MS signature. I chatted with the Azure people and they don't know.

    Anyone?

    Thursday, April 4, 2019 5:00 PM
  • Please review this site for information about Hardware Dev Center and making submissions for driver signing. 

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/dashboard/

    Friday, April 5, 2019 12:11 PM
  • This was quite a mystery but I got it solved.

    I spent over on the phone with Microsoft yesterday and they found that there was a glitch in the web software that would put me in an endless loop, never allowing me to get to the right place on the website. The glitch was triggered by me having an old account that was registered as a Microsoft "personal" account (for Office 365) rather than a Microsoft work account. Even though both accounts were under the same email address, the web software would never present the choice, but rather send me to the personal account every time. Microsoft personal accounts do not allow code signing so this resulted in the endless loop trying to get to the screen for submitting the file.

    So yeah, it was there, but I couldn't get to it. The work-around was to change the email address of the old account.  The Microsoft support guy was very sharp in spotting the problem. We had a remote session going and he noticed the URL was not right for the driver signing stuff.

    Thanks for your help.

    Friday, April 5, 2019 4:20 PM
  • I found that also. But then found it all too complex... setting up test reports, etc.

    Perhaps some experienced developers should advertise their services for doing just that... submitting our software for approval.

    Friday, April 5, 2019 11:01 PM
  • The learning curve is pretty steep, if you need to do WHQL testing.  There are consulting companies that will do that testing on contract, but they are rather expensive.  If you are going to be creating a lot of devices, then you will want to take the time to set up a test lab with at least two computers, and learn how to use the HCK and HLK.

    If you only need to support Windows 10, you can use attestation signing through the same portal, which does not require the full WHQL testing.


    Tim Roberts | Driver MVP Emeritus | Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.

    Monday, April 8, 2019 6:31 AM
  • It is a a lot of trouble. Funny thing is that my driver has been used on Windows 10 and earlier versions since Windows 10 was released... using code signing from before this new requirement. It still qualifies for Windows 10 and still works fine. But we wanted to change a couple of lines of code.

    Beats me why we have to test something that has proven itself in the field since 2015 (4 years).

    Monday, April 8, 2019 7:15 AM
  • >Beats me why we have to test something that has proven itself in the field since 2015 (4 years).

    Perhaps because Windows itself has changed, and could become incompatible with your great driver

    -- pa

    Monday, April 8, 2019 3:03 PM
  • No change has occurred and the driver works perfectly. It uses codesigning from before Windows 10 was released so it is ok for Windows 10. The problem is that resigning that driver today will require codesigning by this verification process and the rigmarole that goes with it.
    Tuesday, April 9, 2019 1:10 AM
  • In our case, weren't even resigning the code. As we discovered, the problem is with later versions of Window 10, specifically 1803 and 1809. There is a another variable here, UEFI Secure Boot. On 1803 and 1809, if Secure Boot is ON (which is normally the case), driver's will fail to load. Yet another variable is whether the Windows 10 was an earlier version (16XX or 17XX) that was upgraded to 1803 or 1809, or was a fresh install of 1803 or 1809. The upgraded Win10 installations will load the drivers, but not the fresh installs. There are enough variables here that at times the problem appeared to be random, until we figured out what was going on.

    The bottom line is this. Unless signed by Microsoft using attestation signing or the WLK/WCK method, drivers will not load on fresh installs of Windows 1803 or 1809. To do attestation signing, you need a EV Code Signing cert. You sign your code with your EV cert and then submit it to MS for validation and signing by them.

    We just received our EV cert and USB key today and will be taking the attestation route

    Tuesday, April 9, 2019 3:52 PM