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Visual Studio Solution Support for Build and Debug RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear Azure Sphere Community,

    We notice that "starting with the 20.01 release, we can open Azure Sphere projects in Visual Studio to inspect project properties and other settings, but they will not build successfully." And there is a guide on Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure-sphere/resources/convert-vcxproj-cmake. And I have tried that we can still open and build a CMake project for Azure Sphere in Visual Studio.

    So, does this mean that we can not create a Azure Sphere project with templete? And will Visual Studio Code OK for this(I mean build, deploy and debug)?

    Thank you!


    Keep Fighting

    Friday, February 21, 2020 2:00 AM

Answers

  • Hello Jiong,

    Please note that, development of Azure Sphere applications with Visual Studio 2017 is no longer supported starting with the 20.01 release. We released support for Visual Studio Code and Linux in the fall of 2019, and we continue to support Visual Studio 2019. Both Visual Studio 2019 and Visual Studio Code provide additional support for CMake beyond what is available in Visual Studio 2017.

    In addition, development with Visual Studio 2019 now requires version 16.4 or more recent.

    On Windows, you can compile, build, and debug Azure Sphere apps with Visual Studio 2019, with Visual Studio Code, or the command line.

    On Linux, you can compile, build, and debug Azure Sphere apps with Visual Studio Code or the command line.

    Deprecation of Visual Studio projects

    Since the 19.10 SDK release, all new Azure Sphere apps are built using CMake by default. CMake is a cross-platform build system that you can use for all your development: for high-level apps and real-time capable apps; for Windows and Linux; and for development in Visual Studio, Visual Studio Code, or the command line.

    The 20.01 SDK release does not support the use of Visual Studio projects (.vcxproj and msbuild). You will need to convert any existing apps to build with CMake. See Convert a Visual Studio project to CMake for guidance.

    Please refer What'snew in the 20.01 release for more information. Do let us know if you have further queries.

    Friday, February 21, 2020 6:44 AM

All replies

  • Hello Jiong,

    Please note that, development of Azure Sphere applications with Visual Studio 2017 is no longer supported starting with the 20.01 release. We released support for Visual Studio Code and Linux in the fall of 2019, and we continue to support Visual Studio 2019. Both Visual Studio 2019 and Visual Studio Code provide additional support for CMake beyond what is available in Visual Studio 2017.

    In addition, development with Visual Studio 2019 now requires version 16.4 or more recent.

    On Windows, you can compile, build, and debug Azure Sphere apps with Visual Studio 2019, with Visual Studio Code, or the command line.

    On Linux, you can compile, build, and debug Azure Sphere apps with Visual Studio Code or the command line.

    Deprecation of Visual Studio projects

    Since the 19.10 SDK release, all new Azure Sphere apps are built using CMake by default. CMake is a cross-platform build system that you can use for all your development: for high-level apps and real-time capable apps; for Windows and Linux; and for development in Visual Studio, Visual Studio Code, or the command line.

    The 20.01 SDK release does not support the use of Visual Studio projects (.vcxproj and msbuild). You will need to convert any existing apps to build with CMake. See Convert a Visual Studio project to CMake for guidance.

    Please refer What'snew in the 20.01 release for more information. Do let us know if you have further queries.

    Friday, February 21, 2020 6:44 AM
  • Dear AshokPeddakotla,

    Thank you so much for your quick reply.

    So, is there any guide or turtorial to show the steps to create a CMake project for Azure Sphere from scratch with Visual Studio or Visual Studio Code?


    Keep Fighting

    Friday, February 21, 2020 6:51 AM
  • Friday, February 28, 2020 10:34 AM