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Why only one rather than two spaces auto added at end of sentences in the input panel / handwriting recognition / Tablet PC RRS feed

  • Question

  • Any way to "auto" insert TWO spaces at the end of each sentence in the handwriting input panel, rather than accept the automatic 'one' space it places at the end of each sentence?.....to handwrite continuously and seamlessly without correcting the entire document when done, adding in the extra space at the end of each and every sentence. 

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated..........Thanks, Lo

    Saturday, March 22, 2008 1:24 AM

Answers

  • Hello LoKais.

     

    While seemingly simple to add two spaces at the end of each sentence, it actually requires an incredibly complex language model, one that needs to be redesigned for each language. Unfortunately, we do not currently have that capability in Tablet PC Input Panel.

     

    Sorry that I could not be of more help.

     

    Eliot - MSFT

    Tuesday, April 8, 2008 12:45 AM

All replies

  • Hello LoKais.

     

    While seemingly simple to add two spaces at the end of each sentence, it actually requires an incredibly complex language model, one that needs to be redesigned for each language. Unfortunately, we do not currently have that capability in Tablet PC Input Panel.

     

    Sorry that I could not be of more help.

     

    Eliot - MSFT

    Tuesday, April 8, 2008 12:45 AM
  • Lo,

     I am happy to help, as this is an on-going area of mild frustration for me, but not for the same reason.

    I'm a graphic designer by trade, but I spent my university years typesetting everything from envelopes to newsletters, and a lot of time *removing* the double spaces after periods. Please indulge me a little history lesson.

     The whole double-space-after-final-punctuation thing began with typewriters. It has to do with character width. Each letter occupied the same horizontal space, so the "i" had more white space around it than the "m." The effect was a very grid-like page. To offset sentences visually, the standard style of typesetting mandated a double space after final punctuation. Anyone who took typing or business writing in highschool prior to 1990 learned this rule as gospel.   

     But with word processing, all that changed. Font sets adjust the width each character occupies according to the width of the letter. (The white space is evened out, despite the width of the character.)

     So...the point of this lengthy explanation is to tell you that...double-spacing after final punctuation is no longer correct.

     Happy word processing,

     Dez   

    Sunday, April 13, 2008 3:16 PM
  • Dez,

     

      Yes I did learn in typing class (in 1978) to put two spaces after the period at the end of each sentence.  This was considered to be "grammatically" correct, however I do notice more and more that in emails and online, people tend to only use one space instead.  While it's not only that I'm an old dog, I continue to do it because I think it is much more visually appealing, letting the reader take pause with each sentence.  It allows for less of a run-on sentence "look".  Don't you agree?

     

      I also noticed that you only use one space to indent each paragraph, when it was also taught that you must use two spaces to indent, as well.  You kids!!

     

      Happy typing,

      :-)  LoKais

     

    P.S.  I guess I just need to get with the (new) program. 

     

     

    Sunday, April 13, 2008 8:50 PM
  •  JoyfulDez wrote:

    Lo,

     I am happy to help, as this is an on-going area of mild frustration for me, but not for the same reason.

    I'm a graphic designer by trade, but I spent my university years typesetting everything from envelopes to newsletters, and a lot of time *removing* the double spaces after periods. Please indulge me a little history lesson.

     The whole double-space-after-final-punctuation thing began with typewriters. It has to do with character width. Each letter occupied the same horizontal space, so the "i" had more white space around it than the "m." The effect was a very grid-like page. To offset sentences visually, the standard style of typesetting mandated a double space after final punctuation. Anyone who took typing or business writing in highschool prior to 1990 learned this rule as gospel.   

     But with word processing, all that changed. Font sets adjust the width each character occupies according to the width of the letter. (The white space is evened out, despite the width of the character.)

     So...the point of this lengthy explanation is to tell you that...double-spacing after final punctuation is no longer correct.

     Happy word processing,

     Dez   




    Dez,

       I'm quite curious to when you went to a university. I am currently working on my research paper for my B.A. and it is required, as per the professor to have two spaces after each sentence. "No longer correct," does not apply when there are still others using this method. Actually, it is then still acceptable.

    For the thread creator, I found this on another page and hope it will be helpful. It's a pain to fix NOW, but it will be able to correct the spacing (I get to go through 25+ pages of correcting the spaces, but not manually).

    Go to Options from the Tools menu. Go to the Spelling & Grammar tab. Click on the Settings button. Use the Spaces Between Sentences drop-down list to indicate how many spaces you prefer between your sentences.
    Tuesday, April 29, 2008 6:19 AM
  • Nin,

    I just got Office 2007 and there is a Spelling and Grammar button under the Review tab, but I can't seem to find a "Settings button" or where the settings would be for this.  It may be just what I'm looking for though.

    Let me know if you can point me in the right direction.

    Thanks,

    :-)  Lo

    Tuesday, April 29, 2008 2:48 PM