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Is .NET Core Going to Replace the .NET Framework? RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • I wasn't sure where to ask this.

    Is .NET Core and the .NET Framework going to always exist side-by-side now? Or are we heading towards .NET Core replacing the .NET Framework?

    Saturday, June 18, 2016 4:02 AM

All replies

  • Hi XSapien,

    >>"Is .NET Core and the .NET Framework going to always exist side-by-side now?"

    Yes. .NET Core will not replace the .NET Framework. .NET Core is a subset of .NET Framework and it makes sense to be cross-platform.

    For Console Application, library and ASP.NET, .NET Core is the future. But for GUI applications, for example, Windows Forms and WPF. .NET Framework is the only way to do it.

    Best Regards,
    Li Wang


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    Saturday, June 18, 2016 7:04 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi XSapien,

    >>"Is .NET Core and the .NET Framework going to always exist side-by-side now?"

    Yes. .NET Core will not replace the .NET Framework. .NET Core is a subset of .NET Framework and it makes sense to be cross-platform.

    For Console Application, library and ASP.NET, .NET Core is the future. But for GUI applications, for example, Windows Forms and WPF. .NET Framework is the only way to do it.

    Best Regards,
    Li Wang


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Not so sure about that.

    WPF is a replacement for WinForms. And UWP is the Core based and 'Appified'* brother of WPF. UWP can effortlessly repalce WPF.
    And unless I am missreading something here, ASP.Net 5 is already based on Core:
    https://dotnet.github.io/about/overview.html

    I see the abandonment of .NET 4.6 series in favor of Core as at least a Strategic Option for Microsoft. ASP.Net and XNA would be the big loosers. Maybe it is even a goal.

    Mind you the shift towards Core was way overdue and nessesary:
    Platform independance was always a major goal of .NET Framework, but has been turning it's wheels in the mud partically without end since 1.1. With Core they are finally going into that direction.
    Also the .NET ecosystem had grown unwieldy - we easily have 3 totally disinct datagrids in the .NET Framework (one for each of WinForms, WPF/UWP and ASP.Net). Porting all that would have been a nightmare.

    But also look at the most recent Windows:
    I also see the recent shift towards UWP on Windows 10 - down to penalizing old style Desktop applications (including anything base on .NET 4.6). I would say with Windows 10 "Appification"* has reached the Windwos world (they already tried with WinRT in Win 8).
    If Windows 10 takes off, a core only future is likely. But that is a pretty big if - Windows XP showed us that the Commerce sector will decide wich is the next long-term Windows OS and I do not really see Windows 10 as convincing in that regard.

    Core vs .NET Framework will pretty much be decided by the success of Windows 10 (or whatever comes later).

    *Appification is a word I just invented on my own. It means "turning every programm that is into a app with equal function". WinRT and UWP are clear signs the recent windows try to hop that bandwagon. But I am not sure it still has as much steam.


    Saturday, June 18, 2016 9:51 AM
  • >>Or are we heading towards .NET Core replacing the .NET Framework?

    No.

    .NET Core is not a replacement for the full .NET Framework. The (full) .NET Framework is still the platform of choice for building rich desktop applications and .NET Core doesn't change that. For example, Windows Forms and WPF are not part of .NET Core.

    Please refer to the following MSDN blog post for more information about this: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2014/12/04/introducing-net-core/

    The following article would also be worth reading: http://thenewstack.io/the-opportunity-of-net-core-and-why-it-will-not-fade-away/

    "But .NET Core is not going to replace the current .NET Framework For one thing, as director of program management Jay Schmeltzer explained to us, “The two are designed to be functionally equal from an API standpoint, as much as possible, and specifically where MVC and Store/Phone apps are concerned. That said, and though many components are identical, they’ll never have an exact 1:1 API equivalency...Indeed, the .NET Framework doesn’t go away. Schmelzer says he expects it to be what some Windows developers will stick with. “For Windows Desktop development, the full framework will continue to be the framework for developers using technologies like Windows Forms and WPF while .NET Core will be the framework of choice for developers building Windows Store, Windows Phone and ASP.NET apps."


    Hope that helps.

    Please remember to close your threads by marking helpful posts as answer and then start a new thread if you have a new question. Please don't ask several questions in the same thread.

    Sunday, June 19, 2016 5:26 PM
  • I wasn't sure where to ask this.

    Is .NET Core and the .NET Framework going to always exist side-by-side now? Or are we heading towards .NET Core replacing the .NET Framework?

    We really have to clarify what we understand as "replacing" in this context.

    Microsoft does not really repalce in the conventional meaning of the word. It stops development, marks as deprecated and brings out something new to focus all energy on.
    I mean COM is still around. But would anyone on this Forum argue .NET is not a clear replacement for COM?

    Windows forms was not exactly "replaced" by WPF either. Yet they clearly stopped adding new stuff, to focus more on WPF.
    WinForms "did not go anywhere" in the sense it was not being removed from the .NET Libraries. But it also "did not go anywhere" in terms of new features either.

    Neither did ASP.Net 1, ASP.Net 2, ASP.Net 3 or ASP.Net 4 "go anywhere".
    Or DirectX 1 through 12 (or whatever number we are on right now minus 1).

    If the question is:
    Will development of the .NET Framework slow down/stop in favor of .NET Core development?
    Most likely, if everything goes as planned. If you would bet real money on it, the payout would be terrible (possibly negative).
    UWP seems a pretty clear case of trying to "end the desktop application" in favor of the UWP Apps. And it is already a continuation of WPF, while also being aimed a bit a gaming (taking care of XNA).
    And there is a ASP.Net 5, wich is based on Core.

    Old school desktop apps: Deprecated.
    Apps: UWP
    Games: UWP
    Webages: ASP.Net 5 based on Core

    Will there be a .NET Framework for the future of Windows 10? Most likely too. It won't get new features, but will get updates to "keep working" with the new builds.
    Will there be a .NET Framework for the Windows after 10 (that is not supposed to come?). Depends how many years or decades in the future that is.

    It really depends on how Windows 10 is received. I see a pretty steep gamble on Microsofts side with UWP/the App store. That is why they keep pushing it out for free. That is the bandwagon MS finally managed to get the jump on. But I am not so sure that Bandwagon is not already rolling out.

    If it works out or goes the way of Windows ME/Vista/8 and 8.1 remains to be seen.

    Sunday, June 19, 2016 10:45 PM
  • I think it's the same as when people were comparing writting applications in Java and VB.

    When you write applications in Java, you can run it on other platforms. When you write things in VB, you can use all the Windows native components and do lots more UI tricks, not to be blocked by the "highest common factor" of all the platforms UWP has to support.

    Also, since UWP applications are "sandboxed", if your application is intended to interact with Windows Services or drivers, don't waste time of UWP. It could possibly be done but won't worth the effort. (When your Windows services / drivers can run on desktops only and not devices, it doesn't make sense to spend time to write a counterpart on "mobile". Why limit yourself on the choice of what can be used?)


    Monday, June 20, 2016 1:37 AM
    Answerer
  • No.

    .NET Core is not a replacement for the full .NET Framework. The (full) .NET Framework is still the platform of choice for building rich desktop applications and .NET Core doesn't change that. For example, Windows Forms and WPF are not part of .NET Core.

    Hi Magnus,
    is your meaning still as strong as it was, when you've written theses sentences?
    .NET Framework will be dead more and more.
    WinForms and WPF will be in the future part of .NET Core.

    We are talking here about a technologie of a not reliable Company, they tell today a and tomorrow they doing b and forget about a. Or they starting not to talk any word about a, that's Microsoft.

    There are existing a lot of examples for this. Sadly.

    I'm now excited for your answer.


    Friday, July 12, 2019 10:08 AM
  • Hello,

    Bottom line is .NET Framework as is and before .NET Core remains "as is" and will not have no features. Use it as .NET Core never existed. 

    Those who move to .NET Core are doing so simply because .NET Core offers things that are not available with the standard .NET Framework.

    See also which is an article on server based solutions but can also be applied to desktop solutions.

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/choosing-core-framework-server#when-to-choose-net-framework


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    Friday, July 12, 2019 1:18 PM
    Moderator