none
Brand new to VB - Where do I start? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm an experienced programmer in other languages and an experienced DB designer.  I want to learn VB.  I will use VB with databases, but not just databases.  I noticed I have VB within my Access software, but it doesn;t seem to match up to the online lessons I've viewed.  Should I use VB 2008 Express Edition or VB.NET or something else.  Also, how does the VB in Access differ from these forms of VB? 
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:04 PM

Answers

  • Vb in Access is VBA and is significantly different from VB.NET.

    VB 2008 Express Edition *IS* VB.NET.

    One of the best places to start is the development center:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vbasic/ms789086.aspx

    Hope this helps.
    www.insteptech.com ; msmvps.com/blogs/deborahk
    We are volunteers and ask only that if we are able to help you, that you mark our reply as your answer. THANKS!
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:21 PM
  • Demac3,

    I am still pretty new myself, I have created a couple of programs for work but would still not consider myself an export by any stretch. I started out with MS Access and then moved to Visual studio express and then into Visual Studio 2008 Standard.


    When I switched to Visual Express, I started with the tutorials found on MSDN http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/beginner/bb964633.aspx is a good place to start.


    The learning center is good to start out basic programming and building on it. One you have that down you can start expanding into new things.

    When you get stuck, doing a search here is a great resource.


    Hope this helps.

    Gspeed316

    If this is the answer, please mark it as such.
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:27 PM
  • The product you are referring to is Visual Studio 2008 or VB 2008 Express Edition.

    Make sure you know how to search in MSDN, as it is your best technical reference:
    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Search/en-US/

    Remember to check out Insert Snippet (right click in the code) whenever you need assistance in a particular task - often the snippet is there just waiting to be inserted.

    Make sure you understand debugging - breakpoints, single step, local variables and watch variables as an absolute minimum.

    Help is useful if you use it appropriately. Samples, for instance, can be quite useful, as is Dynamic help (if you have the screen real estate).

    Be aware that the .Net framework has changed a lot over the years, and much of the material on the Internet is out of date, doesn't specify what version it refers to, or even refers to a completely different product (such as VBA or VB6).

     
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:49 PM
  • Demac,

    i have a database and general application tutorial (widgets inc project) on my website which may help you get a basic start on working with vb.net and and database.  you can apply much of what is in the tutorial to basically any application.  it does go over information about classes and methods as well.  it is there if you would like to take a look.

    i think that when people here vb.net they get intimidated when they have been in the vb6/vba world for a while.  even though visual studio is very different from vba in office products, the language is fairly similar.  something to keep in mind is that .net has some new and better ways to work with databases, you can still use ado but it is recommended to use ado.net.  there are classes that are geared more for specific data providers.  so in vba/vb6 you may work more with recordsets, in vb.net you will work more with datareaders and datasets/datatables, and some additional objects as well depending.

    i would suggest not looking to closely at the help videos that are based on the dataset designer.  this will help you generate some quick setups but will leave you with a lot of questions when you attempt to extend what it gives you by default. 

    hope this helps
    FREE
    DEVELOPER TOOLS     CODE     PROJECTS

    DATABASE CODE GENERATOR
    DATABASE / GENERAL  APPLICATION TUTORIAL
    Upload Projects to share or get help on and post the generated links here in the forum
    www.srsoft.us
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 12:16 AM

All replies

  • Vb in Access is VBA and is significantly different from VB.NET.

    VB 2008 Express Edition *IS* VB.NET.

    One of the best places to start is the development center:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vbasic/ms789086.aspx

    Hope this helps.
    www.insteptech.com ; msmvps.com/blogs/deborahk
    We are volunteers and ask only that if we are able to help you, that you mark our reply as your answer. THANKS!
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:21 PM
  • Demac3,

    I am still pretty new myself, I have created a couple of programs for work but would still not consider myself an export by any stretch. I started out with MS Access and then moved to Visual studio express and then into Visual Studio 2008 Standard.


    When I switched to Visual Express, I started with the tutorials found on MSDN http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/beginner/bb964633.aspx is a good place to start.


    The learning center is good to start out basic programming and building on it. One you have that down you can start expanding into new things.

    When you get stuck, doing a search here is a great resource.


    Hope this helps.

    Gspeed316

    If this is the answer, please mark it as such.
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:27 PM
  • The product you are referring to is Visual Studio 2008 or VB 2008 Express Edition.

    Make sure you know how to search in MSDN, as it is your best technical reference:
    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Search/en-US/

    Remember to check out Insert Snippet (right click in the code) whenever you need assistance in a particular task - often the snippet is there just waiting to be inserted.

    Make sure you understand debugging - breakpoints, single step, local variables and watch variables as an absolute minimum.

    Help is useful if you use it appropriately. Samples, for instance, can be quite useful, as is Dynamic help (if you have the screen real estate).

    Be aware that the .Net framework has changed a lot over the years, and much of the material on the Internet is out of date, doesn't specify what version it refers to, or even refers to a completely different product (such as VBA or VB6).

     
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 10:49 PM
  • Another great thing to use it Intellisense, which tells you what properties and methods a class has, as well as what they do. It can very useful for finding what you want sometime.
    Bill Gates look out!
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 11:56 PM
  • My best friend is the Object Browser Window in the Visual Studio IDE.
    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 12:07 AM
  • Demac,

    i have a database and general application tutorial (widgets inc project) on my website which may help you get a basic start on working with vb.net and and database.  you can apply much of what is in the tutorial to basically any application.  it does go over information about classes and methods as well.  it is there if you would like to take a look.

    i think that when people here vb.net they get intimidated when they have been in the vb6/vba world for a while.  even though visual studio is very different from vba in office products, the language is fairly similar.  something to keep in mind is that .net has some new and better ways to work with databases, you can still use ado but it is recommended to use ado.net.  there are classes that are geared more for specific data providers.  so in vba/vb6 you may work more with recordsets, in vb.net you will work more with datareaders and datasets/datatables, and some additional objects as well depending.

    i would suggest not looking to closely at the help videos that are based on the dataset designer.  this will help you generate some quick setups but will leave you with a lot of questions when you attempt to extend what it gives you by default. 

    hope this helps
    FREE
    DEVELOPER TOOLS     CODE     PROJECTS

    DATABASE CODE GENERATOR
    DATABASE / GENERAL  APPLICATION TUTORIAL
    Upload Projects to share or get help on and post the generated links here in the forum
    www.srsoft.us
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:31 AM
    Thursday, February 11, 2010 12:16 AM