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Load and Web Performance Testing-Browser Mix RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I am new in Load and Web Performance Testing using Visual Studio 2015. By reading several blogs my understanding is

    " The web tests are intended to simulate the load that a browser creates, to put load onto the web server. By design Visual Studio web test facilities do not try and run JavaScript or other scripts, nor do they process .css files"

    if so while designing a load test ,we are getting option of Browser Mix. If it do not executes any client side script I am getting confused how it matters if we do browser mix(IE diff versions, Chrome and Fire Fox) while creating a load test.

    Can any one expalin.

    Thanks and regards,

    Shubhendu

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015 12:27 PM

Answers

  • Hi Shubhendu,

    That dialog is a common source of confusion for people. Webtests do work only at the protocol level, so there is no client side browser running. The Browser mix is just adding headers (User-Agent) string to the requests, which your real browser would also do. So, the way the server knows the browser and capabilities is all driven by the User-Agent header. Why it can be useful for webtests is when the server side code emits a different response, for example a light weight response for mobile browsers. Think of this as causing different server code on the back end being exercised by one browser versus another. If the server does not treat any browser differently, code executes same for all, then there is little reason to spend time on the browser mix anyway.

    The other reason you might want to do this, is you want to force the visual studio webtest playback engine to model different concurrent connections to download dependent requests on. Most older browsers only permitted 2 or 4 concurrent connections, where modern browsers permit 8 or more. This can have a modest effect on the server load depending on the server code. Finally, if you wanted to create your own custom User-Agent string, for easier web log harvesting for example after load tests run, then you might also consider this, or modifying the defaults.

    -rogeorge


    http://blogs.msdn.com/rogeorge

    Friday, October 2, 2015 4:40 PM

All replies

  • Hi Shubhendu,

    >>if so while designing a load test ,we are getting option of Browser Mix. If it do not executes any client side script I am getting confused how it matters if we do browser mix(IE diff versions, Chrome and Fire Fox) while creating a load test.

    In load test, we could add/custom the browser mix settings like this document:

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997561.aspx

    All browser files which are using to be as the browser emulation, they are called from the folder:

    C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\IDE\Templates\LoadTest\Browsers

    Actually we could also add custom browser type like this blog:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/slumley/archive/2006/11/15/adding-an-ie7-browser-template-for-use-by-web-tests.aspx

    Best Regards,

    Jack


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    Thursday, October 1, 2015 9:05 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Shubhendu,

    That dialog is a common source of confusion for people. Webtests do work only at the protocol level, so there is no client side browser running. The Browser mix is just adding headers (User-Agent) string to the requests, which your real browser would also do. So, the way the server knows the browser and capabilities is all driven by the User-Agent header. Why it can be useful for webtests is when the server side code emits a different response, for example a light weight response for mobile browsers. Think of this as causing different server code on the back end being exercised by one browser versus another. If the server does not treat any browser differently, code executes same for all, then there is little reason to spend time on the browser mix anyway.

    The other reason you might want to do this, is you want to force the visual studio webtest playback engine to model different concurrent connections to download dependent requests on. Most older browsers only permitted 2 or 4 concurrent connections, where modern browsers permit 8 or more. This can have a modest effect on the server load depending on the server code. Finally, if you wanted to create your own custom User-Agent string, for easier web log harvesting for example after load tests run, then you might also consider this, or modifying the defaults.

    -rogeorge


    http://blogs.msdn.com/rogeorge

    Friday, October 2, 2015 4:40 PM
  • Hi rogeorge,

    I got my confusion with browser mix clear. Thanks for your detail and straight answer.

    Thanks and regards,

    Shubhendu

    Monday, October 5, 2015 5:18 AM