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Need a better approach so that we're not duplicating so much effort RRS feed

  • Question

  • A couple years ago I asked here in this forum a question, Have some more questions about creating a template project. That question was answered.

    However, I realize now that I wasn't asking the right question, so I'm back to improve the question I really would like answered. Let me give a little background. I work on a small team in a government agency. We're working to replace some very old applications, written either using MS Access or entirely contained within Excel spreadsheets, with something more modern and certainly more easily maintained. We wrote a main app, which we call Core. It's checked into TFS. It doesn't do anything "real", as in it doesn't work against data of any importance. It's just there to work out functionality. Then, what we've been doing, when we need to create a new app based upon Core to address replacing one of these legacy Access app or Excel spreadsheet, is someone gets into Visual Studio or TFS, to branch Core into a separate branch, for the new project. This new branch is never meant to be merged back into Core, as you would normally do when branching a project in TFS (or any other source control system). And to make matters worse, in complete violation of the DRY principle, if some change to the basic functionality is done within a child branch, it must manually be duplicated in Core and all other projects branched from Core. And of course if anyone makes any change in Core, it must be manually duplicated to all child branches.

    I was bothered by this two years ago and I'm even more bothered by it now, because we're making more branches to address really old apps. This practice doesn't make sense, which is why I asked the question I linked to previously. I thought that somehow a template project would handle this problem. I now realize that question was the wrong question to address our needs. So, I'm asking here, what is a better approach so that if we need to make a change to code that is in Core or any child branch from Core that affects code within Core, that code change can better be migrated to all projects branched from Core as well as put into Core?


    Rod

    Wednesday, March 27, 2019 5:02 PM

All replies

  • Hi Rod,

    Welcome to MSDN forum.

    TFS forum in MSDN has been locked, because we moved TFS support to Stack Overflow. Our TFS engineers are also in there to help our user as usual. Besides, we also add TFS support in Developer Community when you want to report a problem with TFS itself.

    If you have problems about visual studio IDE, please feel free to let me know.

    Best regards,

    Joyce


    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, March 28, 2019 9:38 AM
  • Hi Joyce,

    I didn't think my question was TFS related. Indeed, like I said in my original post, "...TFS (or any other source control system)…". 

    I'm not so much interested in how this works with regards to TFS, but how to properly architect an application and other applications that derive from it, in whatever mechanism that might take.

    PLEASE, don't put me off because you think this question is specific to TFS!


    Rod

    Thursday, March 28, 2019 2:31 PM