locked
What is The future of VB.NET 2014+

    General discussion

  • I see that Microsoft choose java script and HTML5 for windows 8 and they focusing on C# More than VB.NET , and from reading around the net Microsoft trying to cancel VB.NET and make programmers choose C# as the main language for .NET
    Sunday, September 08, 2013 12:35 AM

All replies

  • Microsoft has one team working on C#.Net and another team working on VB.Net. The VB.Net team has always lagged the C#.Net team because C# was derived from C++ an objected oriented language and VB6 was not object oriented.  This was really an issue with VS2002 and VS2003. With each release of VS since the VB.Net team has been getting closer.  Today, there are only slight differences in the two languages. Both languages compile to the same IL code. .Net introduced the managed heap and garbage collector, something C++ and VB6 did not use. JAVA uses a similar scheme (managed heap and garbage collector). VB.Net will never be removed from VS.  Now a better alternative for VS will someday arrive.  I have been programming for 47 years in many different languages and each new language was an improvement over the previous language. 

    The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.

    Sunday, September 08, 2013 2:15 AM
  • Hi mishar82,

    Maybe this issue can be sent to http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio (submit an idea).


    If you think one reply solves your problem, please mark it as An Answer, if you think someone's reply helps you, please mark it as a Proposed Answer

    Help by clicking:
    Click here to donate your rice to the poor
    Click to Donate
    Click to feed Dogs & Cats


    Found any spamming-senders? Please report at: Spam Report

    Sunday, September 08, 2013 2:20 AM
  • MS is not going to retire VB.NET. You do know there are other application types other than things that run at the lipstick UI.  Right? There are other Windows O/S(s) that are not Windows 8 like Win XP, Vista and Win 7 that are heavy in use. Win 2k, Win 2k3 servers etc, etc that are still heavily being used that are running VB.NET applications.

    Application types such as Windows Service, Console Application, legacy Web service, WCF services, classlib (DLL) all done with VB.NET that have nothing to do with the UI,  and companies are using all of the technologies and are running those solutions on machines. And they will continue to run VB.NET on machines.

    Why would MS invest anything in JavaScript? It was the fallout with MS and Sun Micro Systems over Java that lead to the development platform of .NET.

    Also, businesses are going to be at the Windows 8 desktop doing the same things like they can do now at the Win 7 or Vista desktop to conduct day-2-day or business-2-business activities on a desktop powered by VB and or C#.NET applications. The State of NY's most high profile applications, as an example, are running on VB.NET, which is a heavy MS client. And there are many others around the US and the world that are using VB.NET that are heavy MS clients.

    You show any official MS documentation where it states the MS is going to terminate or retire VB.NET. All you see if you do look is a lot of blabber mouth lip-service about VB.NET being retired. It's not going to happen.

    Sunday, September 08, 2013 2:40 AM
  • VB and C# are developed by one team which is under control of Anders Hejlsberg. In that team are persons biased to VB and to C# like Anders Hejlsberg, but non of them would say any of the two is better. 



    Success
    Cor

    Sunday, September 08, 2013 7:28 AM
  • javascript is not Java.  And it very quickly become the lingua Franca of client side webprogramming. 
    Monday, March 10, 2014 6:16 PM
  • There was just a successful change.org petition to bring back VB6.  To make a 64-bit version.  Seems in 2014 there is still a large demographic that prefer VB6 over .Net or Java.  The change.org signers are from as most a diverse country set as can be imagined.

    I wonder if the new management at MS will act on this or ignore as they have done in the past.

    Sunday, March 16, 2014 3:00 PM
  • There was just a successful change.org petition to bring back VB6.  To make a 64-bit version.  Seems in 2014 there is still a large demographic that prefer VB6 over .Net or Java.  The change.org signers are from as most a diverse country set as can be imagined.

    I wonder if the new management at MS will act on this or ignore as they have done in the past.

    Successful?, then there would be a million voters, I see 6 reactions, a kindergarten petition gets more.. 

    Be aware that the old management of Microsoft did not ignore all the petitions. VB8 (2005) got a lot from old vintage VB6 behaviour (The My Namespace with its bad memory mapping) which is disliked by the users of the real Visual Basic of that time (VB7).


    Success
    Cor


    Sunday, March 16, 2014 3:12 PM
  • I see that Microsoft choose java script and HTML5 for windows 8 and they focusing on C# More than VB.NET , and from reading around the net Microsoft trying to cancel VB.NET and make programmers choose C# as the main language for .NET

    Java Script and HTML5 are client side technologies used for rendering content in a platform independent manner and/or for taking advantage of the latest browser capabilities.

    But guess what kind of project(s) you create to serve that client side data?  That's right, it is your VB or C# project that is generating the clientside JS or HTML5 code.

    Of course at this point in time the majority of what you see written on the web focuses on Windows Store Apps for the various Windows 8 platforms.  There is very little talk about "classic" desktop and web applications right now.  But the reason for this is not that Microsoft is transitioning away from .Net in favor of JS or HTML5... the reason is that Microsoft already owns the PC Desktop market-space and has for a long time.  The problem is that they have only a small fraction of the modern "App market-space", which is currently dominated by Apple, with Google being the ones hot on their heals.  It should come as no surprise that the loudest talk will center around "Apps" until either MS gains a dominate market-share, or the fad wears off (whichever comes first).

    You cannot speak of the future of C# and that of VB as two separate cases; there is only the future of .Net which equally includes both languages. If you want to keep up with the development of .Net languages, then this is the blog to follow: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/

    Here's a post from last summer that should put your mind at ease and allow you to trust what Cor has already told you:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vbteam/archive/2013/07/17/no-new-vb-and-c-language-features-in-vs-2013.aspx


    Reed Kimble - "When you do things right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all"

    Sunday, March 16, 2014 5:15 PM
    Moderator
  • The replies here are the usual chorus of positive reassurances that all is well in VB land. Doubters can expect a solid dose of scorn.  However, I have recently started a new project and I find that the lack of VB.NET training aids - tutorials, examples, books, etc - to be clear indication that all is not well. There is no shortage C# material so, I've really been forced to learn C# even though I really like VB and it's perfectly adequate for my needs.

    I suspect that there are many programmers who feel as I do.  Many of us are not programming full time and yet we really like VS and MS technologies as it allows us to leverage skills we learned over many years.  For me, learning a new language is just a waste of time.  Even though I was a C/Unix programmer years ago, learning C# is going to be very time consuming.

    My previous webs sites have been "VS.NET Web Sites" and now I have a reason to work with a VS.NET Web Application - it's a non-trivial project and involves a whole host of other MS technologies (SQL SVR, EF, Linq, etc).  I fully expected to spend a considerable amount of time working with tutorials and other training aids.  What I actually spent a considerable amount time doing, was searching for appropriate tutorials and training aids - and I found lots of C# stuff that is right on target for what I needed - and very little VB stuff that was at all up to date.

    Support for Language does not just mean a common IL or runtime compatibility or fixing bugs - it also requires providing lots of support material - as MS does for C#.


    Dave Harney

    Friday, December 19, 2014 10:23 PM
  • There was just a successful change.org petition to bring back VB6.  To make a 64-bit version.  Seems in 2014 there is still a large demographic that prefer VB6 over .Net or Java.  The change.org signers are from as most a diverse country set as can be imagined.

    I wonder if the new management at MS will act on this or ignore as they have done in the past.

    Well when your diverse countries aren't diverse enough to move to VB.Net after VB6 quit being upgraded then of course they want the antique back rather than having to learn something new or having to make new programs in VB.Net from whatever the VB6 program used to do.

    Although VB6 will not ever come back it's funny when peeps beg to return to antique world. Maybe we should bring back ENIAC and paper tape or punch cards to program on.

    VB.Net is here until something replaces .Net which is a framework.


    La vida loca

    Friday, December 19, 2014 11:55 PM
  • The replies here are the usual chorus of positive reassurances that all is well in VB land. Doubters can expect a solid dose of scorn.  However, I have recently started a new project and I find that the lack of VB.NET training aids - tutorials, examples, books, etc - to be clear indication that all is not well. There is no shortage C# material so, I've really been forced to learn C# even though I really like VB and it's perfectly adequate for my needs.

    I suspect that there are many programmers who feel as I do.  Many of us are not programming full time and yet we really like VS and MS technologies as it allows us to leverage skills we learned over many years.  For me, learning a new language is just a waste of time.  Even though I was a C/Unix programmer years ago, learning C# is going to be very time consuming.

    My previous webs sites have been "VS.NET Web Sites" and now I have a reason to work with a VS.NET Web Application - it's a non-trivial project and involves a whole host of other MS technologies (SQL SVR, EF, Linq, etc).  I fully expected to spend a considerable amount of time working with tutorials and other training aids.  What I actually spent a considerable amount time doing, was searching for appropriate tutorials and training aids - and I found lots of C# stuff that is right on target for what I needed - and very little VB stuff that was at all up to date.

    Support for Language does not just mean a common IL or runtime compatibility or fixing bugs - it also requires providing lots of support material - as MS does for C#.


    Dave Harney

    I don't see any scorn in this thread.

    Shortage of VB.Net training aids?

    That's funny since I've alot of "Favorites" for my browser so when peeps ask how to learn VB.Net I can provide them links to "training aids". Although, IMO and not having programmed prior to 2.5 years ago or so, VB.Net is rather simple to use and I'm not certain at some point why anymore training would be necessary. It seems to me simple enough to search the MSDN Library using the MSDN Library search engine as well as the net and this forum to find about anything needed VB.Net wise.

    Do you require links to training aids?


    La vida loca

    Saturday, December 20, 2014 12:00 AM
  • "All you see if you do look is a lot of blabber mouth lip-service about VB.NET being retired.....a kindergarten petition gets more..  "Shortage of VB.Net training aids? That's funny". 

    I don't think its funny.

    "VB.Net is rather simple to use and I'm not certain at some point why anymore training would be necessary".  Apparently, you are much more talented than I am.

    It's very easy to find tutorials for almost any ASP.NET technology if you program in C#

    http://www.asp.net/web-forms/overview/getting-started/getting-started-with-aspnet-45-web-forms/introduction-and-overview

    http://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/getting-started-with-ef-using-mvc/creating-an-entity-framework-data-model-for-an-asp-net-mvc-application

    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/training-courses/introduction-to-asp-net-mvc

    Not so easy to find the same in VB - especially for VS2013.  I think it's a disservice to keep saying that VB is fully supported by MS.  It would be more useful to simply tell any programmer who wants to work in the MS world to adopt C# as the most general purpose language.


    Dave Harney

    Saturday, December 20, 2014 2:15 AM
  • "All you see if you do look is a lot of blabber mouth lip-service about VB.NET being retired.....a kindergarten petition gets more..  "Shortage of VB.Net training aids? That's funny". 

    I don't think its funny.

    "VB.Net is rather simple to use and I'm not certain at some point why anymore training would be necessary".  Apparently, you are much more talented than I am.

    It's very easy to find tutorials for almost any ASP.NET technology if you program in C#

    http://www.asp.net/web-forms/overview/getting-started/getting-started-with-aspnet-45-web-forms/introduction-and-overview

    http://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/getting-started-with-ef-using-mvc/creating-an-entity-framework-data-model-for-an-asp-net-mvc-application

    http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/training-courses/introduction-to-asp-net-mvc

    Not so easy to find the same in VB - especially for VS2013.  I think it's a disservice to keep saying that VB is fully supported by MS.  It would be more useful to simply tell any programmer who wants to work in the MS world to adopt C# as the most general purpose language.


    Dave Harney

    Well I convert C# to VB all the time if the first find that appears as good code for an issue is in C# using either Telerik's online converter or one of Tangibles free demo converters. So I don't really see an issue there.

    And MSDN's Library the majority of the time has code in VB or C#.

    But then again I wouldn't expect MS to put out Tutorials for every namespace they provide. That would be rediculous and rather difficult to maintain. After all some of their code samples are obviously from a long time ago and are, by my judgement which may be inaccurate, difficult to understand because they contain way too much unecessary code for what they do.

    And to actually learn how to do something takes time as there's a learning curve obviously especially with controls like the Chart Control and some others.

    However I download projects all the time for using code from which I don't understand to the depth I would if I'd actually had to create all of it after studying via the MSDN Library on how to write the same code and then constantly revising it as I learn more.

    That's where a programmers capability and experience come from. I could never write code like Reed Kimble or Cor Ligthert (or other responders in this forum) can write simply because they have greater knowledge through their experiences and education over time then I will ever have or now be able to retain.

    What they could write in a couple of hours may take me weeks, months or never to be able to do on my own. Especially to the level either of them (and numerous other responders in this forum) could as they (and others) can reduce to the simplest possible instructions the code I may write by using various capabilities I may not know anything about. I've seen this time and again from alot of people in this forum. Like reducing an algebraic expression to the simplest possible expression it can be reduced to but they do that with code.

    But at that point it's because they study, have studied and learned things over time that I haven't ever seen or known about yet. Especially with regard to higher level math skills and understand how code works since math in some form is used for alot of codes capabilities that may not be understandable at a glance to someone like me.

    That's why some programmers can be tasked and complete tasks exceedingly fast over others. And will always be the case.

    Perhaps what Cor says is irritating to you. But Cor doesn't post, IMO, to provide politically correct information. Cor just posts facts and analogizes alot doing so. So don't take it personally.

    And if I was going to change from one language to another it wouldn't be C# it would be C++. Way more difficult, I used it before a bit a long time ago, but it provides capabilities way beyond VB or C#. But with my memory capabilities now I couldn't learn it to the level necessary for programs I can write in VB at this point in time.

    Nor would I move to C# as one of your links has a link for MVC 5 with EF 6 in Visual Basic - Creating an Entity Framework Data Model and I can usually find VB code for most things I can find in C#.


    La vida loca

    Saturday, December 20, 2014 3:59 AM
  • I agree.  Although I see more on-line stuff for C#, I can usually find plenty of on-line stuff for VB.Net.  If I can't, Telerik comes to the rescue.  No problem at all with VB.Net
    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 3:42 PM