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Win32 API core profiler RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi. Is there Win32 API documentation about a core profiler in Windows?

    I want to understand the architecture of such profiler; that is, the runtime relationships between related Win32 API calls, activation, involved DLLs, processes, threads and the profiled process.

    Thank you very much in advance for any help.

    Update May 6:

    I don't see much about profiling at Windows API Index. Where in Windows documentation should I find about core profiler as described?

    Windows API Index

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ff818516.aspx

    Friday, May 6, 2016 12:03 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    According to your description, I am confused. Perhaps you should point out that specific issues. if you want to learn more about windows programming. You can see the book(windows internal).

    Best Regards,

    Hart


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place. Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Monday, May 9, 2016 8:59 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    Thank you for feedback.

    About the relationships between related win32 API, involved DLLs, process.

    I think the process from birth to death is very useful to you.

    1.        The operating system calls createprocess function by using shell.
    2.        The operating system will create kernel project used to identify the process.
    3.        The operating system will create 4GB’s virtual address space.
    4.        The linker will put code,DLLs into the space above.
    5.        At the end of the CreateProcess will create primary thread
    6.        The operating system will call C runtime library to start Startup code.
    7.        The Startup code will call the main function of the application.
    8.        The application will run successfully.
    9.        When the application will end, then the program will come back to startup code.
    10.    The operating system call exitprocess to over the process.

    Best Regards,

    Hart


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place. Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6:55 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • What do you mean by core profiler?
    Saturday, May 7, 2016 7:36 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    According to your description, I am confused. Perhaps you should point out that specific issues. if you want to learn more about windows programming. You can see the book(windows internal).

    Best Regards,

    Hart


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place. Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Monday, May 9, 2016 8:59 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mike. Thank you for your comment. By ‘core profiler’ I mean a most basic Windows capability that allows profiling of what is happening in a given active Windows process (state of calls, state of threads, etc.)

    Tuesday, May 10, 2016 2:40 PM
  • Hi Hart Cheng. Thank you for your comment. I am looking for public MSDN documentation about a most basic Windows capability that allows profiling about what is happening in a given active Windows process (state of calls, state of threads, etc.) running in a staging environment (pre-production, no Visual Studio installed).

    Tuesday, May 10, 2016 2:43 PM
  • "I mean a most basic Windows capability that allows profiling of what is happening in a given active Windows process (state of calls, state of threads, etc"

    Hmm, the Windows feature that's closest to this description is probably ETW. The Windows Performance Analyzer is also connected to this.

    That said, I'm not sure how much that will help you with "I want to understand the architecture of such profiler; that is, the runtime relationships between related Win32 API calls, activation, involved DLLs, processes, threads and the profiled process." Windows documentation usually tells you how to use the features, not how they work internally.

    Tuesday, May 10, 2016 2:45 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mike. Thank you for your comment. I did not ask for internals. I asked for “the runtime relationships between related Win32 API calls, activation, involved DLLs, processes, threads and the profiled process.” –that is, the intended organization of such capability; in other words, what is usually called “its architecture”.

    Tuesday, May 10, 2016 4:35 PM
  • Hi,

    Thank you for feedback.

    About the relationships between related win32 API, involved DLLs, process.

    I think the process from birth to death is very useful to you.

    1.        The operating system calls createprocess function by using shell.
    2.        The operating system will create kernel project used to identify the process.
    3.        The operating system will create 4GB’s virtual address space.
    4.        The linker will put code,DLLs into the space above.
    5.        At the end of the CreateProcess will create primary thread
    6.        The operating system will call C runtime library to start Startup code.
    7.        The Startup code will call the main function of the application.
    8.        The application will run successfully.
    9.        When the application will end, then the program will come back to startup code.
    10.    The operating system call exitprocess to over the process.

    Best Regards,

    Hart


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place. Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Wednesday, May 11, 2016 6:55 AM
    Moderator
  • Hart Cheng: thank you very much for your answer.

    Best regards.

    Saturday, July 23, 2016 2:31 PM