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A Simple Compiler RRS feed

  • Question

  • I posed this question on another forum and was advised to try here.  So...

    I record Humpback Whale song and analyze it (Fourier, etc.) on my computer.  I need a computer to do that due to the extraordinary amount of data I collect.  I have been using Delphi 7 but it won't take an upgrade to a new computer or an upgrade from my Dell Win 7 - 64bit.   I've been trying to find a simple C++ or C# IDE and compiler to write my software with. I can use C++ but C# would be my preference.  I have no intention of selling or even sharing the software I write.  It doesn't have to be "state-of-the-art."  A 2010 version would do just fine.  I downloaded C++ Studio, 2013 and 2014 I think, but had to remove them because they wouldn't run.  Something about a Service Pack issue.  My CS ticket is from the '90's and I haven't kept up do date.  The only requirement I have is that I be able to interface my software with  MS Access and Excel 2000.  I use the software I write the same way I use an electric drill; a means to and end.  A 2010 issue would probably be better as I don't need the complication of a Cloud.  A name would be good.  A path would be great.   Thank you, B Kilgore

    Thursday, May 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Answers

  • Since the lead developer of C#, Anders Hejlsberg, was also the chief architect of Delphi (and a developer of Turbo Pascal, the ancestor of Delphi), you'll find a lot of OOP concepts and API namespace layout heavily influenced by Delphi, and therefore the port would be relatively easier too.
    • Marked as answer by Bill Kilgore Thursday, January 3, 2019 7:05 PM
    Friday, May 6, 2016 1:14 AM
    Answerer
  • If it's just for your own use, you can download Visual Studio 2013/2015 Community Edition for free.
    Thursday, May 5, 2016 9:45 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • If it's just for your own use, you can download Visual Studio 2013/2015 Community Edition for free.
    Thursday, May 5, 2016 9:45 AM
    Answerer
  • Delphi was a learning langauge developed specifically by Borlad back in the day. I learned it a bit, but have not used it in about a decade so my information might not be precise.

    The mater of langauges can become a bit confusing with regards to C# and .NET:
    C++ .NET and C# don't have thier own libraries. They share the .NET Libraries with all other .NET Langauges (VB.NET, F#, whatever else). Regardless of the sourcecode language, you end up with a .NET/CLI/MSIL code on compilation that needs the .NET Framework to run.
    .NET borrows a lot of ideas from Java, most importantly Garbage Collection and not letting us work with naked pointers. Having knowledge in it is a boon.
    If you learned Delphi I would say C++ .NET would be a good language to transition too, as afaik Delphi was developed in part as a teaching tool for it. But C# might be just as close. And in the end .NET defines a dozen more rules anyway.

    Native C++ is a totally different mater altogether - no GC, handling naked pointers and a lot of other stuff that is tricky to use, but allows optimal performance. If you meant it when writing C++, this is the totally wrong Forum, it has nothing in common with C# and we propably link the wrong compilers.
    You can not use Native C++ Libraries in C++ .NET easily, but the other way around works out.

    Thursday, May 5, 2016 1:34 PM
  • Since the lead developer of C#, Anders Hejlsberg, was also the chief architect of Delphi (and a developer of Turbo Pascal, the ancestor of Delphi), you'll find a lot of OOP concepts and API namespace layout heavily influenced by Delphi, and therefore the port would be relatively easier too.
    • Marked as answer by Bill Kilgore Thursday, January 3, 2019 7:05 PM
    Friday, May 6, 2016 1:14 AM
    Answerer
  • cheong00

    Thank you so much for your suggestion of my using C# as my go-to programming answer.  It really is exactly what I've been looking for.  I had assumed that, since I had studied C++ at Michigan, I should use that.  Back then I could carry my Borland C++ compiler around on a 1.44 meg floppy.  Visual Studio is 17+ gig.  Particularly your mentioning that Anders Hejlsberg's as being the chief architect of C#.  In the short time I've been using it, I do see his ideas being present in the tools.

    BK

    Thursday, January 3, 2019 7:16 PM