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Visual Basic 6.0 future compatibility RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi
    I understand that Microsoft is committed to supporting visual basic applications up and including Windows 7.0. Does anyone know what their plans for support concerning PC and server operating systems beyond this?

    Does installing system files (i.e. TABCTL32.OCX, etc.) impact future operability at all?

    Paul
    Friday, December 18, 2009 4:57 PM

Answers

  • See the below link for their support statement:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788708.aspx


    Paul ~~~~ Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Friday, December 18, 2009 5:44 PM
  • Hi
    I understand that Microsoft is committed to supporting visual basic applications up and including Windows 7.0. Does anyone know what their plans for support concerning PC and server operating systems beyond this?

    Does installing system files (i.e. TABCTL32.OCX, etc.) impact future operability at all?

    Paul

    Hi Paul,

    As far as I am aware, Microsoft no longer support Visual Basic 6 and all versions below that.

    Having that OCX file on your system, as far as I know will not affect anything, especially if the file is not used.

    I believe OCX files are like DLL files only that they are for OBJECT CODE.

    You could always run VB6 and older software within MS Virtual PC.>>

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/

    Download for Virtual PC.>>

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/support/virtual-pc-2007 .aspx


    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details .aspx?FamilyId=28C97D22-6EB8-4A09-A7F7-F6C7A1F000B5&displaylang=en


    Time will tell what their plans for server OSes are but I can not see Microsoft ever abandoning server
     operating systems altogether. I don't think they will ever do that.

    In conjunction with VB6 though I would forget it and move up to VB.Net.


    Regards,

    John


    I'm currently looking for work in Vb.Net software development. :-)
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Friday, December 18, 2009 5:51 PM
  • The link that was posted stated that VB 6.0 apps should work in 32-bit WOW mode.  In the future, it's very possible all of these will run with future versions of Windows but that is not a guarantee.  For instance, I have Visual Basic 3.0 floppy disks.  It works on XP, but it does not work on Vista/Windows 7 (I also have Visual Basic 1.0 for DOS... it _does_ work on Windows 7).  Clearly neither of those are supported anymore but it gives you a reference (VB3 is also a 16-bit app). 

    I don't know specifically if the extended support until 2013 means it will work with a manual install or not (I think it's impressive the life span of support on it).  I've moved on from VB6, but personally I loved it at the time and we still have some VB6 apps we support at work.  As per programming languages go, VB6 was one of those right apps at the right time that exploded.  To me it was an illustration of hitting what the market wanted dead on dead on and producing something that could be used by both businesses and hobbyists which created a massive community at the time. 
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Sunday, December 20, 2009 8:16 PM

All replies

  • See the below link for their support statement:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788708.aspx


    Paul ~~~~ Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Friday, December 18, 2009 5:44 PM
  • Hi
    I understand that Microsoft is committed to supporting visual basic applications up and including Windows 7.0. Does anyone know what their plans for support concerning PC and server operating systems beyond this?

    Does installing system files (i.e. TABCTL32.OCX, etc.) impact future operability at all?

    Paul

    Hi Paul,

    As far as I am aware, Microsoft no longer support Visual Basic 6 and all versions below that.

    Having that OCX file on your system, as far as I know will not affect anything, especially if the file is not used.

    I believe OCX files are like DLL files only that they are for OBJECT CODE.

    You could always run VB6 and older software within MS Virtual PC.>>

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/

    Download for Virtual PC.>>

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/support/virtual-pc-2007 .aspx


    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details .aspx?FamilyId=28C97D22-6EB8-4A09-A7F7-F6C7A1F000B5&displaylang=en


    Time will tell what their plans for server OSes are but I can not see Microsoft ever abandoning server
     operating systems altogether. I don't think they will ever do that.

    In conjunction with VB6 though I would forget it and move up to VB.Net.


    Regards,

    John


    I'm currently looking for work in Vb.Net software development. :-)
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Friday, December 18, 2009 5:51 PM
  • Hi John
    One follow up, as I understand it, the visual basic runtime appears to be made of "compiled binary files originally included in the redistribution list for Visual Basic 6.0". These files are grouped into support and unsupported files.

    In the future, for Windows 8 and beyond, even though the runtime environment will not be supported by MS, could one manually install/register all the above needed system files that make up the VB 6.0 runtime to make VB 6.0 applications run anyway on Windows 8 PCs?

    Or are there other factors that would make VB 6.0 applications not run on Windows 8 and beyond? Also, does the fact that VB 6.0 applications are 32-bit impact anything?

    Paul
    Sunday, December 20, 2009 12:46 PM
  • The link that was posted stated that VB 6.0 apps should work in 32-bit WOW mode.  In the future, it's very possible all of these will run with future versions of Windows but that is not a guarantee.  For instance, I have Visual Basic 3.0 floppy disks.  It works on XP, but it does not work on Vista/Windows 7 (I also have Visual Basic 1.0 for DOS... it _does_ work on Windows 7).  Clearly neither of those are supported anymore but it gives you a reference (VB3 is also a 16-bit app). 

    I don't know specifically if the extended support until 2013 means it will work with a manual install or not (I think it's impressive the life span of support on it).  I've moved on from VB6, but personally I loved it at the time and we still have some VB6 apps we support at work.  As per programming languages go, VB6 was one of those right apps at the right time that exploded.  To me it was an illustration of hitting what the market wanted dead on dead on and producing something that could be used by both businesses and hobbyists which created a massive community at the time. 
    • Marked as answer by Jeff Shan Tuesday, December 22, 2009 10:14 AM
    Sunday, December 20, 2009 8:16 PM
  • Hi John
    One follow up, as I understand it, the visual basic runtime appears to be made of "compiled binary files originally included in the redistribution list for Visual Basic 6.0". These files are grouped into support and unsupported files.

    In the future, for Windows 8 and beyond, even though the runtime environment will not be supported by MS, could one manually install/register all the above needed system files that make up the VB 6.0 runtime to make VB 6.0 applications run anyway on Windows 8 PCs?

    Or are there other factors that would make VB 6.0 applications not run on Windows 8 and beyond? Also, does the fact that VB 6.0 applications are 32-bit impact anything?

    Paul


    Hi,

    As I do not work for Microsoft I can not answer your questions and Windows 8
     doesn't exist yet or if it does it is only on the developers PC's within Microsoft.

    Please see this support statement.>>

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788708.aspx


    Regards,

    John

    I'm currently looking for work in Vb.Net software development. :-)
    Sunday, December 20, 2009 9:13 PM