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Visual Business Basic--to learn, or not to learn?--THAT is the question! RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am the new IT guy at my small company (>25 users).  The company uses an application that is written in Visual Business Basic.  This application is very important in our business, and does such things as job creation, quotes, inventory control.  The company provides electomechanical technology support for various factories in the area.

     

    My company pays quite a bit for outside persons to make modifications etc. to this software.  The company that created the software says that everything is "open" with their program, so anyone can modify it.  The program is written in Visual Business Basic. 

     

    I would very much like to be the person that my company can call on to do this kind of stuff.   I have 10 years exp. in IT working with desktops and servers, but only a passing acquaintance with Visual Basic.  Can anyone give advice on how hard this is to learn?   Should I tell my boss that I can learn this and be the person they can rely on in the future to maintain this software?  Would I be making a promise I can't deliver on?  Should I learn .net instead?  Thanks for any advice!

    Monday, May 14, 2007 6:44 PM

Answers

  • What the company says about their application may differ than the actual characteristics of the application, such as extensibility, maintainability, scalability, manageability, etc. These characteristics are called non-technical requirements, or quality-of-service requirements. They are the more significant aspects of software architecture, especially for distributed enterprise systems.

     

    Visual Business BASIC is a version of Visual BASIC, which is a Microsoft version of BASIC. BASIC is an acronym for the Beginner's All-purpose Standard Instruction Code. This is an old programming language that is more than thirty years old. I learned how to program with BASIC when I was eight years old.

     

    Jump thirty years. There are significant limitations inherent in the language, which is a structured language. My advice would be to learn the application features, learn how the business users use the application, learn the areas where they have problems and/or features that they would like to have but can't, I would ask the third-party for as much software documentation they have on the design of the application.

     

    I would think about reengineering the application and removing the dependency upon the third-party, i.e. remove the costs that your company pays to make modifications.

    Your manager/boss/supervisor might like you better and think your cool if you could reduce the costs of making modifications via reengineering the application.

     

    My advice would be to learn the Java programming language and the Java EE Reference Architecture. If you have 10 years working in IT, then this should not be an issue if you are dedicated and disciplined. It may take you about six months of dedicated study to learn to program. You should jump right in and try to learn the Java EE Architecture. This knowledge will enable you to build a Java-based system that will function and work great!!!

     

    If you are starting from scratch, you should start with the best!! There is no time to waste!!!

     

    Glossary of Terms for Enterprise Software Development

    http://www.masonicartbook.com/docs/technology/pages/J2EEGlossary.xml

     

     

     

    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:57 PM

All replies

  • Its better to learn .net
    Monday, May 14, 2007 8:22 PM
  • What the company says about their application may differ than the actual characteristics of the application, such as extensibility, maintainability, scalability, manageability, etc. These characteristics are called non-technical requirements, or quality-of-service requirements. They are the more significant aspects of software architecture, especially for distributed enterprise systems.

     

    Visual Business BASIC is a version of Visual BASIC, which is a Microsoft version of BASIC. BASIC is an acronym for the Beginner's All-purpose Standard Instruction Code. This is an old programming language that is more than thirty years old. I learned how to program with BASIC when I was eight years old.

     

    Jump thirty years. There are significant limitations inherent in the language, which is a structured language. My advice would be to learn the application features, learn how the business users use the application, learn the areas where they have problems and/or features that they would like to have but can't, I would ask the third-party for as much software documentation they have on the design of the application.

     

    I would think about reengineering the application and removing the dependency upon the third-party, i.e. remove the costs that your company pays to make modifications.

    Your manager/boss/supervisor might like you better and think your cool if you could reduce the costs of making modifications via reengineering the application.

     

    My advice would be to learn the Java programming language and the Java EE Reference Architecture. If you have 10 years working in IT, then this should not be an issue if you are dedicated and disciplined. It may take you about six months of dedicated study to learn to program. You should jump right in and try to learn the Java EE Architecture. This knowledge will enable you to build a Java-based system that will function and work great!!!

     

    If you are starting from scratch, you should start with the best!! There is no time to waste!!!

     

    Glossary of Terms for Enterprise Software Development

    http://www.masonicartbook.com/docs/technology/pages/J2EEGlossary.xml

     

     

     

    Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:57 PM