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Recover manually from SQL Server 2008 installation failure RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Hi there,

     

    I have experienced a serious problem during the installation of SQL Server 2008 Enterprise Edition on 32-bit Vista, which left the installation in a faulty state, neither allowing repair nor uninstall. The cause of the problem was that I installed the software on my laptop from a ISO image located on a file share on my workstation. The workstation went offline (well, I accidentially restarted it.. Surprise). Anyhow, this stopped the installation unrecoverable. The error message was always something like:

     

    MsiGetProductInfo failed to retrieve ProductVersion for package with Product Code = '{F3494AB6-6900-41C6-AF57-823626827ED8}'. Error code: 1605.

     

    Here is my solution:

     

    As reinstallation of the OS is not an option (I don't reinstall 30+ software packages plus setup my work environment because of SQL Server!), an all hardcore suggestions in the newsgroups didn't do the trick, I analyzed the registry keys on a successful installation, i.e. my workstation. The following I found out:

     

    1. Installation Codes and Product Codes

     

    SQL Server 2008 consists of about 30 products registered in the Registry. Each product has a product code (a GUID) as well as a installation package code (also a GUID). For example the product CommonFiles has the product code

    2E43F6A45E9061642B72A4624A886A9F

     

    and the installation code:

     

    {4A6F34E2-09E5-4616-B227-4A26A488A6F9}

     

    2. How to Find Out Product Codes

     

    Well, either you ran the installation and take the installation code from the error message and look it up in the registry, correct just this error and re-run the installation. If you did it right, the installation will go past the error, either successfully or with a new error 1605 for a different installation code.

     

    Note: The error message contains the installation code. The product code is not communicated to you.

     

    The second option is to look for through the subkeys of

     

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\RefCount

     

    and make a list of all mentioned installation codes and search for the corresponding product codes in the registry. Under

     

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData\S-1-5-18

    \Products\productcode\InstallProperties

     

    the string value ModifyPath contains the installation code.

     

    3. Product Code Usage in Registry

     

    The product code can be found in a number of locations (as key):

     

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\Installer\Features

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\Installer\Products

     

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData\S-1-5-18\Products

     

    The installation code can be found (as key):

     

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall

     

    Note: There is also a mentioning of the product code in HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\Installer\UpgradeCodes. Although, I do not know if copying of these is required for a successful installation. (I did copy them.)

     

    Note: Furthermore, the product code is mentioned in

     

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData\S-1-5-18\Components

     

    I did not copy these.

     

    4. Export and Import Keys

     

    I exported all these the keys from the healthy installation and imported the keys into the faulty installation.

     

    5. Copy MSI Files

     

    I also found out, I need to copy the C:\Windows\Installer\*.msi files mentioned in LocalPackage string values for each of the products. I assume that these files are created by the Windows Installer to start the appropriate installation package.

     

    And voilà! the installation runs through smoothly. Smile

     

    I hope I didn't forget anything essential. Of ocurse, this is only a roadmap, and there should be a tool that corrects the faulty installation, but I couldn't find any.

     

    This is quite dangerous work on system and the registry, you must have calm hands and fingers! Wink

     

    Bjorn

    Thursday, September 4, 2008 2:40 PM