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SQL Server 6.03.9600.17415 vs Newer SQL drivers e.g. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2012 Native Client - QFE RRS feed

  • Question

  • Does the old SQL server Driver potentially perform a lot slower than the more modern drivers like Microsoft® SQL Server® 2012 Native Client - QFE  Version 11.

    Could that cause application slowdown.  Or is there likely no performance difference connecting to SQL 2012 Sql server.

    Kind regards,

    Peter

    Tuesday, August 21, 2018 3:53 PM

Answers

  • Hi  Peter,

    As far as I know, newer SQL server drivers maybe perform better since the older drivers are unlikely to be enhanced.

     

    The full name of SQL Server Driver is SQL Server ODBC Driver. It’s an old driver since sql 2000. ODBC is the primary native data access API for applications written in C,C++, PHP, Python and others for connecting to SQL Server. It's widely used in data integration scenarios. Also, it's preferred if you are developing application on Windows and deploying it to Linux . You can use it to connect to SQL Server 2016, but you will not be able to access new features and functionality of SQL Server 2016.

     

    SQL Server Native Client is containing both the SQL OLE DB provider and SQL ODBC driver to support native connectivity to SQL Server and support all features of sql server 2016. It's the best in windows environment. However, it is not recommended to use this driver for new development. The new OLE DB provider is called the Microsoft OLE DB Driver for SQL Server (MSOLEDBSQL) which will be updated with the most recent server features going forward.

     

    When possible, you can use SQL Server Native Client preferentially. It is far more superior in terms of performance than an ODBC connection. ODBC is basically another layer of abstraction. If  you want to support different databases and to switch them at run-time, ODBC may be suitable for you. But if you're sure that you're going to stick with Sql Server, Native Client may be the better way to go.

     

    Here is a post which has the similar issue , you can refer to this post: 

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/sqlserver/en-US/64f4e4dd-e744-4d2a-a2df-6a3e2dda0d79/why-sql-native-client-is-faster-than-sql-server-driver?forum=sqldataaccess

     

    Hope it is helpful to you.

     

    Best Regards,

    Rachel Wang



    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, August 22, 2018 8:07 AM

All replies

  • I recall that I attended a presentation at PASS 2005 where the Progam Manager for SQL Native Client at the time said that they had been able to obtain a 20 %  performance enhancement. To this comes that the old driver does have full support for data types added to SQL 2005 and later, which can affect some queries considerably. (And others not at all.)

    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se

    Tuesday, August 21, 2018 9:13 PM
  • Hi  Peter,

    As far as I know, newer SQL server drivers maybe perform better since the older drivers are unlikely to be enhanced.

     

    The full name of SQL Server Driver is SQL Server ODBC Driver. It’s an old driver since sql 2000. ODBC is the primary native data access API for applications written in C,C++, PHP, Python and others for connecting to SQL Server. It's widely used in data integration scenarios. Also, it's preferred if you are developing application on Windows and deploying it to Linux . You can use it to connect to SQL Server 2016, but you will not be able to access new features and functionality of SQL Server 2016.

     

    SQL Server Native Client is containing both the SQL OLE DB provider and SQL ODBC driver to support native connectivity to SQL Server and support all features of sql server 2016. It's the best in windows environment. However, it is not recommended to use this driver for new development. The new OLE DB provider is called the Microsoft OLE DB Driver for SQL Server (MSOLEDBSQL) which will be updated with the most recent server features going forward.

     

    When possible, you can use SQL Server Native Client preferentially. It is far more superior in terms of performance than an ODBC connection. ODBC is basically another layer of abstraction. If  you want to support different databases and to switch them at run-time, ODBC may be suitable for you. But if you're sure that you're going to stick with Sql Server, Native Client may be the better way to go.

     

    Here is a post which has the similar issue , you can refer to this post: 

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/sqlserver/en-US/64f4e4dd-e744-4d2a-a2df-6a3e2dda0d79/why-sql-native-client-is-faster-than-sql-server-driver?forum=sqldataaccess

     

    Hope it is helpful to you.

     

    Best Regards,

    Rachel Wang



    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, August 22, 2018 8:07 AM
  • Hi Pete_ML,

     

    I am writing to follow up this thread with you,  have you solved this issue now? If not , please share us your problem. If you have, in order to close this thread, please kindly mark helpful replies as answers. By doing so, it will benefit all community members who are having this similar issue.  Your contribution is highly appreciated.

     

     

    Best Regards,

    Rachel Wang


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Friday, August 24, 2018 7:52 AM