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Windows SDK 7.1 on Windows 10

    Question

  • Issue definition: The Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 4 setup installer has compatibility issues with Windows 10, preventing the installation of the VC compilers.

    Link to the Windows v7.1 SDK installer: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=8279

    The error message looks like this:


    Clicking 'OK' shows the Visual C++ Compilers install item as greyed out, and cannot be selected for install.

    This issues affects many development scenarios - such as compiling code for Mathworks Matlab, to the development of Mixxx open-source DJ software on Windows.

    A solution to this would be very much welcome.

    Thanks.


    Saturday, September 5, 2015 12:06 PM

Answers

  • Thanks for the response.

    In the meantime, I have discovered a workaround for those who specifically need the older compilers (SDK itself can be installed in Visual Studio 2015 add/remove components):

    1. Uninstall any Visual C++ 2010 Redistributables from the control panel first.

    2. Download the corresponding offline ISO image from the Windows SDK archive.

    3. After mounting the image, open F:\Setup\SDKSetup.exe directly.


    • Edited by Jeremy J Wong Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:00 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jeremy J Wong Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:01 AM
    Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:00 AM

All replies

  • Hi Jeremy J Wong,

    I have tried install the Windows SDK 7.1 on Windows 10 and I get the same warning windows. Then I check the System Requirements on the download page, it supports following operating system. So I think it is incompatible with Windows 10. I suggest you download the Windows 10 SDK from following link.
    Windows 7, Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard Edition (32-bit x86), Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard x64 Edition , Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, Windows XP Service Pack 3

    Windows 10 SDK:
    https://dev.windows.com/en-us/downloads/windows-10-sdk


    In addition, this problem is more related to Windows Desktop SDK, I will move this thread to Windows Desktop SDK Forum for a better help. Thank you for your understanding.

    Best Regards,
    Weiwei

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015 5:57 AM
  • Thanks for the response.

    In the meantime, I have discovered a workaround for those who specifically need the older compilers (SDK itself can be installed in Visual Studio 2015 add/remove components):

    1. Uninstall any Visual C++ 2010 Redistributables from the control panel first.

    2. Download the corresponding offline ISO image from the Windows SDK archive.

    3. After mounting the image, open F:\Setup\SDKSetup.exe directly.


    • Edited by Jeremy J Wong Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:00 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jeremy J Wong Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:01 AM
    Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:00 AM
  • So the first question is: Why do you think you need the Windows 7.1 SDK? It's 5 years and 3 releases old at this point.

    Secondly, if you are using VS 2012 Update 1 or later, VS 2013, or VS 2015 with support for Windows Desktop development, then you actually already have the Windows 7.1A SDK installed. It is used whenever you are using the "v*_xp" Platform Toolset because the Windows 8.x SDK which is used by the default Platform Toolset does not support Windows XP (it requires Windows Vista or later). This provides all the includes and link libraries. See VS 2012 Update 1. VS 2013 and VS 2015 have no problems installing on Windows 10.

    If you are trying to get old tools or samples from the Windows 7.1 SDK, you should be aware of the known issues with it. I have had the most success installing it on a virtual machine and then copying off the samples even on Windows 8.1. See KB2717426.



    Saturday, September 12, 2015 7:42 PM
  • Actually, he stated the answer to this question in the original forum post "such as compiling code for Mathworks Matlab, to the development of Mixxx open-source DJ software on Windows." This is a major problem with a number of third party software libraries, they are one or more revisions out of date.  Note: even if they have a newer version, many small firms cannot afford to upgrade each revision of the Windows compilers. 

    I have a client who recently decided to get a quote to upgrade the third party libraries they use for their product, it turned out to be a significant percentage (i.e. greater than 10%) of last years profit for the product.   While it would be great if everyone could afford (both price and availability of 3rd party libraries) to upgrade to the latest SDK and compilers, the truth is there is still a lot of software dependent of revisions that are now unsupported.


    Don Burn Windows Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com


    Saturday, September 12, 2015 7:55 PM
  • actually i do not think Mathworks is a small firm but what you expressed is right, i really stuck here for a few days and can not any solution. it seems that maybe 70% users  (matlab r2013a/b, windows 10 64bit, ) are suffering from this problem because of some rtm visions.
    Monday, September 21, 2015 12:25 PM
  • The Windows 8.1 and 10 SDKs no longer include the tools targeting .NET 3.5 or earlier, as they previously were in the Windows 7 SDK. Only the tools targeting 4.X or later are now installed. This is major pain for anyone needing to support .NET 3.5 or earlier projects. For instance, if you want to create a 3.5 or earlier satellite assembly using "al.exe", you either need to install the Windows 7 SDK (and you can even install the tools only if that's all you need), or Visual Studio itself (since the version of "al.exe" installed with the Windows 8.1 or 10 SDKs can only create satellite assemblies targeting .NET 4.X or later). The Windows 7 SDK doesn't install on Windows 10 of course (the subject of this thread), so you have no choice but to install Visual Studio itself. Really? Do I really need to install Visual Studio just to pick up the 3.5 version of "al.exe". In my own case, my application requires "al.exe" on a customer's machine and on Windows 10 they'll now be forced to install Visual Studio to get it (because the Windows 7 SDK installation is broken or "unsupported" there). Why would MSFT remove the 3.5 tools from the 8.1 and 10 SDKs in the first place. Do you (MSFT) understand how many people are still working with 3.5 or earlier projects. If you really thought it wasn't required anymore, then why are those tools still installed with Visual Studio 2015 (the latest compiler at this writing) but not the latest standalone SDKs (which are therefore useless for working with 3.5 projects unless you install Visual Studio itself). Stupid.

    Larry (25+ years on MSFT platforms, mostly in C/C++)

    Monday, December 28, 2015 5:33 PM
  • A stripped down version of the Visual Studio and .NET complier toolchain was included in the Windows SDK back in the v6 and v7 timeframe.

    For the Windows 8 SDK, there was an explicit design point to try to trim down the size of the Windows SDK since it is included in all Visual Studio product downloads, as well as the expectation of having a number of them active at once (i.e. with VS 2015 you can end up with 4-5 full copies of different versions of the Window SDK). This is noted on MSDN, and the FWLINK provided there still points back to the Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 4.

    With VS 2015, you have the option of using Express, Community, or Pro+ depending on your licensing terms. There is also a new Build Tools edition.

    Monday, December 28, 2015 9:58 PM
  • To be brutally honest, the situation is unacceptable. I really don't understand it and I'm no rookie (30+ years as a developer, almost all of it on MSFT platforms). Do you (or whoever made this decision) not understand that hundreds if not thousands of developers and their customers are likely affected. I've looked into this situation ad nauseam now after a customer contacted me when my program broke because:

    1. You removed the 3.5 tools from the 8.1 and 10 SDK
    2. You assigned the folder location of the 4.X tools to a new parent registry key which my program can no longer find without an update (it was at a different location in the previous SDKs)

    I won't get into item 2 here, since it's off-topic as far as this thread is concerned, but item 1 isn't. The problem wouldn't exist at all if you didn't remove the 3.5 tools, or if I could get the 7 SDK to install on Windows 10 without relying on a hack. There are several posted on the web, none of which are viable for a professional application to rely on. For all the talk about "design point", "trimming down the size" (do you think disk space or the speed of a one-time only download are really critical issues these days), etc., nothing I've tried will allow me to install the 3.5 tools without installing the Community Edition (not Express, nor the "Build Tools" you posted, which is "pre-release" only at this writing). The Community Edition 2015 ISO file is a 1.9 GB download (actual installed program much larger no doubt), and all my customers need is "al.exe". So much for the new trimmed down SDKs - they're missing what I need so they're useless to me. Searching around the web, others have also complained that the 7 SDK won't install on Windows 10, which would at least be a remedy for item 1 above, and that their own software is now crippled or adversely impacted in some way (affecting both them and their customers). So please, with all due respect, spare me anymore "design points". This is just one of countless frustrating and expensive issues I've had in the past 10 years (compared to previous years). For all your good work, you guys just aren't thinking sometimes (or more accurately, you're thinking too much about yourself, and alienating a lot of developers).


    Larry (25+ years on MSFT platforms, mostly in C/C++)

    Tuesday, December 29, 2015 12:55 PM
  • You should provide the feedback on the Visual Studio blog that you'd like to see a 'Build Tools' edition that includes the .NET toolset, or some other trimmed down way to deploy AL.EXE.

    You can also see if the GitHub version of the .NET tools might be more suitable to your project.

    Purely out of curiosity, what is wrong with moving to using .NET 4.0 for your scenario?  It is even supported on venerable Windows XP.



    Thursday, December 31, 2015 1:49 AM
  • IMHO it's very unlikely that the 3.5 tools will ever be added again (I can cite precedent for this), but even if it was, I can't wait for that. I need to deal with the existing situation in the current version of my app. Moving to .NET 4.0 isn't an option either unfortunately. My application (http://www.hexadigm.com) is a localization tool used to translate the solutions of other developers. One of its features allows them to create satellite assemblies on a translator's machine where Visual Studio isn't normally installed. "al.exe" is required for this (hence my help system provides instructions on installing the "Tools" portion of the SDK), but it's the user's project being targeted, not my own. Their own solution might be using .NET 3.5 or earlier still (I have no control over this) in which case it's the 3.5 version of "al.exe" my program requires (since the 4.X version marks the assembly as 4.X, so it can't be applied to 3.5 or earlier projects). In fact, it was one of my customer's who brought the situation to my attention after installing the latest SDK on a new Win10 machine (only to have my program display a message that the 3.5 version of "al.exe" couldn't be found because MSFT removed it from the 8.1 and 10 SDK). This is one of the "frustrating and expensive issues" I referred to earlier. I've had countless problems like this in the past 10 years (no exaggeration).


    Larry (25+ years on MSFT platforms, mostly in C/C++)

    Thursday, December 31, 2015 3:47 AM
  • Enable Windows XP Support for C++ during installation or modify it after the fact.

    This leaves a 32-bit al.exe in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A and a 64-bit one two levels deeper (./Bin/x64)

    Tooling *is* really getting simpler, my friend (DOS 0.97 remnant here).

    Friday, April 15, 2016 6:42 AM
  • Apparently another way to get it to install is to 'tweak' the registry version of .net to "fool" it into thinking you have an acceptable version of .NET installed, see http://stackoverflow.com/a/32322920/32453
    Wednesday, May 11, 2016 10:24 AM
  • THANK YOU very much for this posting!!!!!!

    It solved my problem of not being able to install Windows SDK 7.1 on a Windows 10 Professional operating system; because of the issues noted with .NET 4 installations and Windows 10

    I followed your advice above; and now have this SDK 7.1 installed on my computer; where it is utilized by my Absoft 11.5 Compiler system.

    This had previously worked under Windows 7 Professional; but with upgrading to Windows 10 Professional it had ceased to work......

    I owe you a beer!!!!!!  Or wine!!!!!!!!  Or name your libation!!!!!

    Again MANY THANKS and KUDOS!!!!!!!

    • Proposed as answer by Yumpin Saturday, August 13, 2016 6:50 PM
    Saturday, August 13, 2016 6:49 PM
  • As a brief 'post script,' I ran into future issues with this software package; on my 64 Bit Dell T7400 machine......

    Was related to various updates and the C++ compilers in the 64 bit environment.....

    Look for this additional 'download,' which was needed to eventually resolve my C++ compiler issues with this installation:

    VC-Compiler-KB2519277.Exe

    By following the instructions for and with the download, the work-around fix was fairly straight-forward.....

    In essence, use the above additional download to re-install the C++ compilers for SDK 7.1 on 64 bit Windows 10 machine.....

     

    Thursday, August 18, 2016 12:09 PM
  • Microsoft has an article with an ID of KB2519277.....

    Tried to post link to it but was not allowed to....

    Thursday, August 18, 2016 10:03 PM
  • How about, it is needed because mt.exe is only included in that SDK and that is still needed by C# projects with manifest files.

    And I'm on VS 2017 and Windows 10.

    Friday, February 23, 2018 11:46 PM
  • which SDK do I need to download?

    There are three SDK are shown GRMSDK, GRMSDKIAI and GRMSDKX ?



    Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:09 AM
  • hi!

    After reading all posts, and veryfing incorrectness of all solutions, basically :

    On any Windows version scenario, with Visual Studio 2012 or higher, nobody can compile C++ projects having a line like this , i.e :

    #include <streams.h> 

    anymore.

    That's all.

    Tuesday, April 10, 2018 10:14 AM