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High Execution Times ASP.net RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I am performaing a load test on one asp.net application. In the results I see the execution time counter of ASP.NET to be very high(100 sec) . When I check the sql profiler, there was nothing wrong. Also the request wait times were also high.

    Other observations,

    The CPU's of web server and sql are not the bottlenecks.

    What could be the reason of having high execution times?

     

    Thanks.

    Monday, August 21, 2006 5:22 PM

Answers

  • Wow, 9 seconds is quite a high response time for only one user on the site.  Trying adding the webtest to a load test and running 5 users to see what happens.  There's no need to overload the web site right off the bat since that will cause very erratic test results if the server can't handle it.  Just inch up the load until you find the breaking point (9 second response time may already be there depending on your requirements) and that's the most load the server/app can reasonable support.

    As I said in a blog post, don't forget that a load testing tool is designed to find bottlenecks.  The fact that you're seeing bad performance with only a few users indicates that you've found a terrible bottleneck in your web application.  The next step should be to analyze the various performance counters and the web app code to try to determine what the problem is.

    Josh

    Thursday, August 24, 2006 7:54 PM

All replies

  • It could be that the web app code is suffering a lot of lock contention or waiting on file or network I/O.  Can you debug the web app itself to see what takes so long?

    Josh

    Thursday, August 24, 2006 4:11 PM
  • Thanks Josh.

    I dont have access to the webapp code.

    I wanna know how many asp.net requests can be processed in one second. Because, if the load test is making requests at a rate greater than what can be processed by the processor in one second, all the requests wait in the queues for thier turn and as a result I was seeing high execution times. Does it make any sense? I dont know how the requests are handled. Just curious.

     

    Thursday, August 24, 2006 6:21 PM
  • Can you try running the web test by itself, not in a load test?  What sort of response times do you see?

    It could be that you are dramatically overloading the server in your load test, but I'm still surprised that you're seeing 100 second response times.

     

    Josh

    Thursday, August 24, 2006 6:33 PM
  • When I ran the webtest, the response time of one page is near 9 sec and the sum of response times of all pages in the webtest is 15 seconds.
    Thursday, August 24, 2006 7:10 PM
  • Wow, 9 seconds is quite a high response time for only one user on the site.  Trying adding the webtest to a load test and running 5 users to see what happens.  There's no need to overload the web site right off the bat since that will cause very erratic test results if the server can't handle it.  Just inch up the load until you find the breaking point (9 second response time may already be there depending on your requirements) and that's the most load the server/app can reasonable support.

    As I said in a blog post, don't forget that a load testing tool is designed to find bottlenecks.  The fact that you're seeing bad performance with only a few users indicates that you've found a terrible bottleneck in your web application.  The next step should be to analyze the various performance counters and the web app code to try to determine what the problem is.

    Josh

    Thursday, August 24, 2006 7:54 PM