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Silverlight to HTML 5 for complex apps - now what? RRS feed

  • Question

  • With the demise of Silverlight, I'm trying to figure out how to migrate a large (100,000+ lines of C# code) to HTML 5 / Javascript.  I'm not Javascript expert, but from what I know, it seems that unless MS has something up their sleeve, it's going to be hard to support things like Binding, Data templates, Linq, Lambda exprressions, libraires with interfaces and generics in Javascript.

    Sunday, November 27, 2011 5:10 PM

Answers

  • SL is not dead and will be usable for a long time.

    The question is "is there a need for my app to be usable absoluytely everywhere ?" if yes, then go for Html, not Html 5 since no browser are implementing the same things. I will propose to use Asp.Net, a very very strong and good technology, the one I was prefering before SL, with big advantages : true serious languages, strong support for databases, and your user end with a very standard html page. Use level 3 or 4 to be sure to be read everywhere with some Ajax.

    Sunday, November 27, 2011 7:15 PM

All replies

  • stop it. There is no demise. You just have to target your product. Silverlight is only for enterprise, there is no doubt about it and is not for the general public. Our approach is to use Silverlight for robust Business products and jQuery based apps for the rest. Do you have a specific product and if so what is the target market?

    Sunday, November 27, 2011 5:44 PM
  • Why bother?

    Microsoft may have gone cold on Silverlight, but it's not "dead". You can still use it, all that code will continue to work and they'll be supporting SL for years to come (and we still have at least Silverlight 5 still to be released). Not being what MS marketing and management bots think is the new hotness is not the end of the world.

    So unless you have a real need to make your application broadly available to as much of the internet as possible, I don't see any point in spending many hours moving your code to an inferior and more primitive platform.

    If of course you do have to make a shift, my personal preference would be to move some of the work to the server so you can at least continue to use LINQ, Lambdas etc. (while using AJAX via a library of your choice to keep the UI relatively responsive).

    Sunday, November 27, 2011 5:55 PM
  • SL is not dead and will be usable for a long time.

    The question is "is there a need for my app to be usable absoluytely everywhere ?" if yes, then go for Html, not Html 5 since no browser are implementing the same things. I will propose to use Asp.Net, a very very strong and good technology, the one I was prefering before SL, with big advantages : true serious languages, strong support for databases, and your user end with a very standard html page. Use level 3 or 4 to be sure to be read everywhere with some Ajax.

    Sunday, November 27, 2011 7:15 PM
  • Microsoft always deliver the backword compatiblity.. so as and when it complete in deliver you have everything. and javasscript will not require to change any time.. and every expression in coding language will not require to change at all.

    Wednesday, December 7, 2011 12:35 AM
  • i have got sthe same problem, i started  a project where SL 3 was in Beta.

    in this time, community was talked about that Silverlight will be microsofts multiplattform standard.

    Then Apple started to not "allow" SL to be on their mobile Plattform.

    The Moonlight Project seems to be dead as well - so we will never get a support for the very important plattforms Android and Linux !?

    Now i have a half finished project that targets primary mobile devices, where the mojority of mobile devices does not support its plattform :-/

    So i have to decide as well: 

    Continue SL development or Port to Html5 ?

    but how to Port ? i have hardly Html5 experiences so i cant make a real cost estimation.

    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 11:18 AM
  • When you want to adress Mobile Devices as your Customer first choise envirenment then  an invest in native Apps for every platform is your best choise.

    Thats the most secure way. HTML5 isn´t a standard and will not become one.

    See here http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-whatwg-archive/2012Jul/0119.html

     

     

    PS: What kind of App did you desgin that you need so long todo development ?  :)

    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 12:38 PM
  • its a Client/Server game.

    Animations are made with "Expression Blend" under usage of StoryBoards  + dynamic instantiation via  code. 

    Layouting is done via Xaml (Panels)

    Custom Pixel Shaders are in use.

    I am still developing in Silverlight.

    Now maybe heading in 3D with Silverlight/XNA, maybe not...

    (XNA usage in SL requires further configuration of Silverlight and Browser Settings, wich is IMHO a problem)

    Thursday, October 4, 2012 6:01 AM
  • If your question is mobile platforms, DO NOT use html5 !

    On mobile devices native applications are the only kind of app really used by customers.

    So for mobile devices you must develop using native languages.

    As this is tedious I can propose you a best approach :

    Use MvvmCross libraries + MonoTouch / MonoDroid + VS 2012.

    Using this strategy you can have ONE SINGLE CODE to address all the targets : WinRT, Android, IoS, WPF.

    All with just one language C#, one platform .NET. A MonoDroid licence is about less than $400 and it worths it !

    Using this strategy you will produce native apps, what customer are asking for, not html 5 / browser tricks that no smartphone and no tablet user want to use.

    Html 5 is a dead dream, as Silvelight, for different reasons. SL is dead because Jobs did not want Flash on IoS (so no SL too), so WPF/Everywhere... the "everywhere" part was dead.

    Html 5 is dead too, because when the buzz was launched nobody was knowing that smartphones and tablets markets will grow so fast and most important, that customers will prefer 99% of times native apps that surfing the web...

    The only solution today and for tomorrow is to produce native apps. And using the approach I explained above, you can do it using just C# and .NET, with one single main code (of course, UI are a bit differents, but MvvmCross is adding Binding to Android for example, so very very near to WinRT).

    Believe me, Html 5 is a dead thing just good for morrons that did not understood what the market is today and what it will be tomorrow, just a mess for people believing the words of a dead guru...

    Friday, October 5, 2012 8:41 AM
  • But still the code reusability.. Building services for your Business Applications and Reusing them all in your Silverlight application, Mobile devices etc.

    Also HTML 5 is still not integrated completely in all the browsers.

    Programmers of .Net feel more comfertable working with Silverlight.

    I hope microsoft will come with something new for silverlight in the coming year.

    Hope something will come up for Windows 8.

    Sunday, October 21, 2012 12:14 PM
  • Mobilize.Net http://www.mobilize.net/silverlight seems to have a solution that can help Jumpstart your move to Windows 10/HTML5 from Silverlight. This tool will parse and analyze the source code of your app and convert references to your choice of Windows 10 APIs or HTML5 with JavaScript. Either way you'll get native C# code with no runtimes.

    On their site it lists the following features:

    • Convert Silverlight Windows Phone apps to Windows 10 apps.
    • Convert Silverlight Web apps to pure HTML5 and JavaScript

    haven't tried it myself. 


    Rami Sarieddine Technical Evangelist

    Thursday, December 10, 2015 12:08 PM