locked
Dynamic Data Support in Newer Versions of Visual Studio RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-326746839 posted

    Will Dynamic Data still be supported in newer versions of Visual Studio ?

    Carlos N. Porras
    (El Salvador)

    Sunday, October 19, 2014 10:23 AM

Answers

  • User-1926401737 posted

    Hi Carlos,

    It still is supported in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC, The Entity DataSource control and the Dynamic Data Provider were updated for Entity Framework 6 in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC.

    For more details you could see the below link.

    Hope it will be helpful to you.

    Best Regards,

    Sw-ing

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, October 19, 2014 11:09 PM
  • User-330204900 posted

    Yes it will, this is because unlike MVC it's a part of the core framework, so you can rely on it being there.

    P.S. I am releasing a new Dynamic Data framework on GitHub soon: there are new filters and field templates and page templates there out of the box. It will be available to install via the Visual Studio Gallery and kept up to date via NuGet.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Monday, October 20, 2014 5:19 AM

All replies

  • User-1926401737 posted

    Hi Carlos,

    It still is supported in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC, The Entity DataSource control and the Dynamic Data Provider were updated for Entity Framework 6 in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC.

    For more details you could see the below link.

    Hope it will be helpful to you.

    Best Regards,

    Sw-ing

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, October 19, 2014 11:09 PM
  • User-330204900 posted

    Yes it will, this is because unlike MVC it's a part of the core framework, so you can rely on it being there.

    P.S. I am releasing a new Dynamic Data framework on GitHub soon: there are new filters and field templates and page templates there out of the box. It will be available to install via the Visual Studio Gallery and kept up to date via NuGet.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Monday, October 20, 2014 5:19 AM
  • User-833090171 posted

    Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that something that is a part of the core framework will continue as such in the future.

    Entity Framework (EF) is one such example. EF used to be a part of the .NET framework, but it is not anymore.

    There are some arguments out there that making something not a part of the framework is actually a good thing, as it allows for even more frequent updates not tied to release schedules.

    Friday, October 24, 2014 7:25 PM
  • User-326746839 posted

    Hi,

    BUT the applications will still run in newer versions or should our clients have to pay for newer developments in whatever new thing that comes to the market?

    That should surely go against the rules of what is well understood as legacy applications

    You're not supposed to be rewriting your business applications every time a new program comes on board, or should you?

    Best Regards

    Carlos N. Porras
    (El Salvador)
    P.S.: If Entity Framework is deprecated what is its newer substitute?

    Friday, October 24, 2014 8:31 PM
  • User-330204900 posted

    Hi TObject, EF4/5 is still backed into the framework it's just that they move the newer versions out so you are stuck with EF4-5 in the framework, and because DD is baked into the core framework it will be there as long as the core remains. So Microsoft could stop improving WebForms completely, but the previouse versions would remain.

    Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that something that is a part of the core framework will continue as such in the future.

    Entity Framework (EF) is one such example. EF used to be a part of the .NET framework, but it is not anymore.

    Saturday, October 25, 2014 9:32 AM