locked
How does LightSwitch Compare to VS Express? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have used C# Express and VWD Express a bit (planning to get much more into it as soon as the CFA is over).  I just found LightSwitch today!  I downloaded and took it for a quick test drive.  It seems to be similar to VS, but I’m thinking it is easier to use.  Is that right?  Things that are simpler, are usually less powerful.  So, I am assuming that the developer gives up some control with LightSwitch, right. 

    Thanks everyone!!

    Monday, May 30, 2011 7:33 PM

Answers

  • A primary difference between the different products is that LightSwitch is really geared towards creating data centric line of business applications with a focus on ‘rapid application development’.

    As a developer, there are various extensibility points which are quite powerful. For example, if you can’t find a built in control that suits your need (for example a map control), you can build your own ‘custom control’ to implement the functionality. You can find out more in the extensibility forum.

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/lsextensibility/threads

    Exploiting these extensibility points requires a premium edition of Visual Studio 2010 and there’s therefore a cost implication involved. Although exact pricing details have not been announced, LightSwitch will also not be free unlike the other Express editions.

    Tim

    • Marked as answer by ryguy72 Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:41 PM
    Monday, May 30, 2011 8:47 PM
  • Lightswitch is a tool that sits ontop of the visual studio shell, that is why it looks simular, but that is about it they are both totally different products.

    With LightSwitch you are able to develop LOB Applications based of a pre designed patern and with a base set of rules around it. With Visual Studio Express you have the ability to develop any type of application you wish, this includes games, business applications, tools and utilities, but not limited. For example with the Visual Studio Express toolset you can add the windows phone tools to it and allow you to write applications and games for the phone... this is something that you can not do with Lightswitch.


    http://www.virtualrealm.com.au - XNA Game Programming News and Resources from Downunder.
    • Marked as answer by ryguy72 Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:41 PM
    Monday, May 30, 2011 11:49 PM

All replies

  • A primary difference between the different products is that LightSwitch is really geared towards creating data centric line of business applications with a focus on ‘rapid application development’.

    As a developer, there are various extensibility points which are quite powerful. For example, if you can’t find a built in control that suits your need (for example a map control), you can build your own ‘custom control’ to implement the functionality. You can find out more in the extensibility forum.

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/lsextensibility/threads

    Exploiting these extensibility points requires a premium edition of Visual Studio 2010 and there’s therefore a cost implication involved. Although exact pricing details have not been announced, LightSwitch will also not be free unlike the other Express editions.

    Tim

    • Marked as answer by ryguy72 Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:41 PM
    Monday, May 30, 2011 8:47 PM
  • Lightswitch is a tool that sits ontop of the visual studio shell, that is why it looks simular, but that is about it they are both totally different products.

    With LightSwitch you are able to develop LOB Applications based of a pre designed patern and with a base set of rules around it. With Visual Studio Express you have the ability to develop any type of application you wish, this includes games, business applications, tools and utilities, but not limited. For example with the Visual Studio Express toolset you can add the windows phone tools to it and allow you to write applications and games for the phone... this is something that you can not do with Lightswitch.


    http://www.virtualrealm.com.au - XNA Game Programming News and Resources from Downunder.
    • Marked as answer by ryguy72 Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:41 PM
    Monday, May 30, 2011 11:49 PM
  • Thanks Time and Glenn!  This is pretty much in sync with my first impression of the utility.  I do a lot of RAD work now; Excel and Access.  I want to get more into distributed apps, and web-based reporting.  I dabbled in VWD, using C# (I need to learn more about this).  I could never see myself developing games and/or mobile apps.  I focus exclusively on finance, and related database-type reporting tools.

    Thanks again guys!!

    Tuesday, May 31, 2011 1:41 PM