locked
Metro + Mouse = Horrible

    General discussion

  • There's been complaints about how Metro is a horrible interface for keyboard and mouse, but that's as far as it goes. We need some examples.

    One reason that comes to mind of why Metro UI stinks so friggin much with the mouse is the fact that the scroll wheel becomes nonexistent and defeats the purpose of the mouse; minimize movement for efficiency. Scrolling exists on the Metro Start Screen, but this is flawed. A user will scroll vertically to move the screen horizontally? That just seems wrong. Sure it works at least though, so I can get used to that.... but open up other Metro apps, like Near Me, scrolling doesn't work. Users literally have to click that ugly horizontal scroll bar on the bottom and move it manually. That defeats the scroll. But hey you can still move the screen at least right? Now open up "Memories, your life book." Scrolling does not work in this application at all. Another case, open up search, and you get a list of things you can search through. Can you scroll through that list to click Search>Apps? No you can't.... What is the point of making a new PC operating system, when the main feature of it breaks the most basic and popular method of input? Come on Microsoft, these applications are suppose to be examples for developers. Right now you showed them how to break basic input devices. You guys are focusing too much on the tablet market instead of focusing on what your largest market is now. Worry about now and how it affects tomorrow, not about tomorrow and how you want it to affect now.

    Another reason I do not like the Metro Start Screen is how it replaces the start menu in the desktop environment and ruins the flow of work when working on the Desktop. Seriously, you tell us to just get use to it. I really do not see the increase in productivity with this method. You know changing from the XP menu to Vista's menu garnered a lot of hate, but we did get used to it, especially power users who used it to launch and find files quickly. The problem I have is, when you want to search or just launch a program from desktop, users will generally click Start to get their list of programs. In this case, you click start you get the Start Screen, full of data and shortcuts, in other words, distractions from what you're doing. The point of being in the desktop environment is to be productive, to focus on what you're doing and efficiently multitasking to accomplish your goal. But say you're typing something, and you need to launch a program, you're going to have to go through that Start Screen, witness all this extraneous information that you don't need. I don't understand why this decision was made. The only answer we get is, try it, and get used to it. I've tried it, and I can't get used to it, it is way too distracting, and many others I believe share this opinion. Don't get me wrong, I like the Metro Start Screen when I'm casually browsing the web and going between casual apps, but when I'm working in the Desktop, I just want to not have to sit through it. It just ruins the flow of work. 

    I think those are two solid examples of disadvantages of the Metro Start Screen. The Metro Start Screen is really nice for touch interface, but fails for Mouse input as stated. It really is a lovely design, with casual use clearly the strong point, but for power users and people who want to get things done, it just gets in the way of things. Yes this is a disadvantage.
    With this being an Developer Preview, it's understandable that things are not finalized. That doesn't change the fact that this is the first impression being made to the public. First impressions are important. If things are not considered, we will see the same complaints we see being posted in this forum in future reviews; how Metro Start Screen breaks work flow from the desktop, not all applications work with basic hardware, application fragmentation, etc. Seeing how the media over inflated what happened with Vista, I don't think Microsoft wants that to happen again. All the users are asking for is the power of choice.

    The only thing this will lead to is application fragmentation due to input devices. We can see that now with the example apps. Some apps only take advantage of touch (you can't scroll even with a mouse!), and some are keyboard only (Labyrinth for example). This just confuses the application ecosystem. How does a developer make their software available for everyone to use? During the keynote, it was shown that there are APIs for dealing with this, but how are the example applications showcasing these things? It is worrisome of a Windows user to think that some applications may not run.
    However, it is obvious that Window users have been having to deal with this for so long, the best example is gaming. System requirements and what not are fine examples of how this is right now. The problem with this is, now system requirements are going to include input device. Why would developers target making touch based applications when a majority of users are using a mouse and keyboard? It boggles me how Microsoft is approaching this. Just because the tools are provided doesn't mean they will be utilized. We need some prime examples of what developers can do with Windows 8, and so far I haven't really seen anything from Microsoft that does that, not even the new Start Screen is a good example. If anything this may drive developers away from the Windows ecosystem to another because of all the fragmentation. With Windows 8 as it is right now I think scares developers away. I'm not one, but thinking about how a developer might approach developing a new application with so many more variables in mind is just scary.

    Example 1
    Scrolling vertical does not translate well to scrolling horizontally.

    Example 2
    Scrolling is not universal, it is broken throughout the Metro Start Screen. Different applications are impossible to use with the mouse. Example is the Memories application, there isn't even a horizontal scroll bar!

    Example 3 (9/15)
    Using the new Start Menu (the condensed charm menu on the lower left of the screen that's hidden). Why in the world would Microsoft put it there, or rather why would Microsoft put the Charm Menu on the side. Upon clicking it, users have to move their mouse cursor all the way to the opposite side of the screen. This is extremely cumbersome.



    • Edited by J-Chord Friday, September 16, 2011 4:00 AM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:13 AM

All replies

  • If you want to remove the metro feature: 

     

    Press WindowsKey + R

    Type: Regedit

    Use the side menu to navigate to:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer 

    double click on RPEnabled  and change the value from 1 to 0

    Edit: This will bring back the old start menu from windows 7. To see the results, you must restart, or you could end the task (explorer.exe) in the task manager, then click File > New Task. Type in "explorer" no quotations and the start-menu should be like the one in Windows 7.
    • Edited by JosephMSDN Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:19 AM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:16 AM
  • If you want to remove the metro feature: 

     

    Press WindowsKey + R

    Type: Regedit

    Use the side menu to navigate to:

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer 

    double click on RPEnabled  and change the value from 1 to 0


    NO, do not do it like this, this disabled WINDOWS8! it's a hidden windows7 feature!

    There is a way to  bypass this though. Set RPenabled from 1 to 0, then after a bit change it back from 0 to 1!

    Here's a post why: www.it-ca.net/blogdylan

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:18 AM
  • I don't want to get rid of it. I do enjoy the Ribbon interface, and the Metro Start Screen (I have an HP tm2t convertible tablet, so its a joy to use Metro). But thinking about how many more people do not have touch screens are really getting shafted by how cumbersome the controls are is not doing well. It isn't a problem for me, but I think Microsoft really needs to reconsider all the negative issues they're getting right now. I can safely assume, that all the complaints about Metro Start Screen are most likely users with only a keyboard and mouse. People praising the screen are those with touch screens, which are far and few.
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:19 AM
  • My way allows you to have all features but the metro UI!

    Sorry if I seem pushy now, but I think it will come in as a great tool for you! ;)

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:20 AM
  • I've been fighting the scrolling issue all day too trying out Win8.  As far as I can tell vertical mouse scrolling is only used in the most basic way in Metro and horizontal mouse scrolling is not in there at all.  At first I thought it was a mouse driver issue (I have it on a Dell Studio Laptop 1555) with the integrated touchpad, but installing other external mice with horizontal scrolling capabilities seems to not help.

     

    What am I missing...

    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:02 AM
  • I find using the mouse easy with 8. Or at least the start screen. It seems apps don't automatically support scroll wheeling or track pad scrolling, which is a major downfall. Hopefully this functionally will be made to be default unless otherwise stated.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:12 AM
  • I find using the mouse easy with 8. Or at least the start screen. It seems apps don't automatically support scroll wheeling or track pad scrolling, which is a major downfall. Hopefully this functionally will be made to be default unless otherwise stated.

    It's an alright experience on the Start Screen, but when you start navigating away from it does it just become way more apparent, especially scroll breaking. I understand it's a beta, but this is a Developers Preview aimed at showing examples of what developers can start to do. I'd assume there should be some pretty solid examples, but it's lacking.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 4:02 AM
  • I think the biggest problem is the scrolling wheel. I tried to run a sample apps using vs 2011. Unfortunately the scrolling wheel does not work at all. It

    Friday, September 23, 2011 2:14 AM