none
Upgrading from 32-bit Access 2010 to 32-bit Access 2016 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have the successful application done using 32-bit MS Office Access 2010 for the engineering document management distributed with MS Access Runtime 2010.

    I am having a problem installing above 32-bit Access Runtime 2010 application on the client having on his computer Office 365Pro64.

    My plan was to upgrade my development to 32-bit Office Professional 2016, create replacement route for the missing Package and Development in 32-bit Access 2016 and hopefully get rid of the problem above.

    Now I see on this forum that there is a issue with installing Access 2016 Runtime on the computer with Office 365.

    Would someone be so kind and give me some advise on the solution to this.

    Thank you in advance.

    MilanW

    Friday, April 29, 2016 2:19 AM

Answers

  • You can’t install office x32 on a computer with office x64 for the SAME version.

    So if the user has say o365 2016 (x64), then you install runtime 2010 (x32)

    If the user has say o365 2010 (x64) then you install runtime 2013 x32.

    So the restricting of x32 vs x64 applies to the SAME version. So you can usually “end run” around the issue by adopting the above approach (simple install a different office version of the Access runtime).

    However, do keep in mind that if you application needs to “automate” word, or outlook etc., then while you can mix and match versions of office, to automate you MUST use the same bit size between programs.

    If they have office 2016 (x64), then you best likely continue to use and install the 2010 x32 runtime.

    However, you cannot “mix” the same version – so Access runtime x32 2016 cannot be installed on a machine with office 2016 (x64).

    As noted, a workaround is to install a different runtime version of Access then the x64 version of office they have installed.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Sunday, May 1, 2016 1:13 AM
  • > I can not install it with 2016 32-bit runtime beside 365Pro64 bit with its Access on the surface.

    You are correct. You simply cannot “mix” different bit size versions of office of the SAME version.

    >Removing Access from 365Pro64 would help.

    That is certaly a possible solution. They likely should not run/install office x64 unless they really need to, or it is a company wide policy/adoption.

    As noted, another workaround is if they have office 2016 x64, then another workaround is to install 2013 or 2010 x32 Access runtime.

    Another possible solution is to convert the access application to Access x64. If the Access application does not use ActiveX controls, and does not use windows API calls, then the Access application can and should run as Access x64 without issues.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    kallal@msn.com

    Saturday, May 7, 2016 8:43 PM
  • Access x64 VBA is the same, and you can use all of the same commands. However, the declare statement is “available” and is supported in VBA x64, but the .dll’s you use would have to be x64 bit versions – you again cannot mix and match bit versions for declare.

    Such declare statements MUST using matching bit size .dll’s. If your .dll’s are for an x32 bit program, then you have to use x32 Access.

    So Access x64 has the same declare commands, but the .dll’s in question would have to be x64 bit size for such declares to work.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Saturday, May 7, 2016 8:46 PM

All replies

  • Depending on what version of Office 365 2016 you have you can have Office 365:

    1. Home (with Access for PC)
    2. Personal (with Access for PC)
    3. Home & Student
    4. Home & Business
    5. Professional (with Access for PC)

    So Access might already be bundled.


    Best regards, George

    Saturday, April 30, 2016 2:50 PM
  • You can’t install office x32 on a computer with office x64 for the SAME version.

    So if the user has say o365 2016 (x64), then you install runtime 2010 (x32)

    If the user has say o365 2010 (x64) then you install runtime 2013 x32.

    So the restricting of x32 vs x64 applies to the SAME version. So you can usually “end run” around the issue by adopting the above approach (simple install a different office version of the Access runtime).

    However, do keep in mind that if you application needs to “automate” word, or outlook etc., then while you can mix and match versions of office, to automate you MUST use the same bit size between programs.

    If they have office 2016 (x64), then you best likely continue to use and install the 2010 x32 runtime.

    However, you cannot “mix” the same version – so Access runtime x32 2016 cannot be installed on a machine with office 2016 (x64).

    As noted, a workaround is to install a different runtime version of Access then the x64 version of office they have installed.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Sunday, May 1, 2016 1:13 AM
  • Hello Albert and George,

    Thank you to both of you for the help. I was the away, its why I am bit late with this.

    IT department guy was installing my AAA ERP database developed on Office Pro 2010 32 bit using its package wizard with MS runtime 2010. This installation was successfully used before on many computers.

    He install above AAA ERP Runtime 2010 32-bit package on MS Surface 4 and later installed 365Pro64.

    When trying to start AAA ERP this program immediately goes to error:

    "The database cannot be opened because the VBA project contained in it cannot be read. The database can be opened only if the VBA project is first deleted. Deleting the VBA project removes all code from the models ... etc."

    There is the debate on this defining error cause as:

    "This issue occurs because Access 2010 SP1 uses a newer version of the VBE7.dll."

    I wonder what would be the best way to solve the issue. Albert, naturally I read your response and wonder if:

    - Removing Access from 365Pro64 would help.

    I did buy 365PRO and converted Access 2010 32 bit package to 365Pro 32-bit Access on the separate test computer and all is running OK (on its full Access).

    What worries me, based on your advise, is that I can not install it with 2016 32-bit runtime beside 365Pro64 bit with its Access on the surface.

    I hope that you will give me a kind response to this.

    Thanks.

    Friday, May 6, 2016 3:48 PM
  • Hi,

    Are You using DLL's or API-Calls?

    Otterwise, i migrated to 2016 without any problems..

    Peter

    Friday, May 6, 2016 6:51 PM
  • Hello Peter,

    Thanks for your replay.

    I am using in Access 2010 32 bit and as said did test transfer everything to 365PPR 32 bit without problem and I am using bunch of dlls mainly for a few 3D CAD applications program must work with.

    There are as well number of API calls and as I read the description of 365Pro64 I cannot even use Declare statement, which pretty well kills this option.

    Problem is to install existing Access 2010 32-bit on the MS Surface 4 laptop with 365Pro64, related to the issue with VBE7.dll as described above.

    Thanks.

    Friday, May 6, 2016 9:06 PM
  • > I can not install it with 2016 32-bit runtime beside 365Pro64 bit with its Access on the surface.

    You are correct. You simply cannot “mix” different bit size versions of office of the SAME version.

    >Removing Access from 365Pro64 would help.

    That is certaly a possible solution. They likely should not run/install office x64 unless they really need to, or it is a company wide policy/adoption.

    As noted, another workaround is if they have office 2016 x64, then another workaround is to install 2013 or 2010 x32 Access runtime.

    Another possible solution is to convert the access application to Access x64. If the Access application does not use ActiveX controls, and does not use windows API calls, then the Access application can and should run as Access x64 without issues.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    kallal@msn.com

    Saturday, May 7, 2016 8:43 PM
  • Access x64 VBA is the same, and you can use all of the same commands. However, the declare statement is “available” and is supported in VBA x64, but the .dll’s you use would have to be x64 bit versions – you again cannot mix and match bit versions for declare.

    Such declare statements MUST using matching bit size .dll’s. If your .dll’s are for an x32 bit program, then you have to use x32 Access.

    So Access x64 has the same declare commands, but the .dll’s in question would have to be x64 bit size for such declares to work.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Saturday, May 7, 2016 8:46 PM
  • Hello Albert,

    Thank you again for your effort and help.

    Will have to do more in house testing and sort it out.

    Off course this problem is not comparable with the situation in our Fort McMurray fire. I am in Toronto area, you are much closer geographically to their suffering.

    Regards,

    Milan.

    Saturday, May 7, 2016 9:06 PM