locked
How can I integrating latest Window SDK developer tools with VS 2008 professional edition so that I can use the \Analyze Static code analysis feature. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a Visual Studio 2008 professional edition. I know that VS 2008 Professional edition does not contain the /Analyze feature , but I have read some where that I can integrate the  latest developer tool present in latest Windows SDK with the Visual Studio 2008 and use the /Analyze feature. Can any let me know how to do it.

    Thanks for your help.

    Wednesday, October 31, 2012 11:32 AM

Answers

  • 1) Yes The Windows SDK ships with FxCop 10.0, which is the same engine used by the Visual Studio Code Analysis feature. Though it doesn't have all the rules the Visual Studio Ultimate edition has. Download and install it as follows.

    2) That is unrelated to the Code Analysis features in Visual Studio. As far as I know, Windows SDK versions are installed side by side (you can have multiple installed). How or why Visual Studio will chose one over the other is unknown to me. I suspect it's driven by the .NET Framework version you select and the way the MsBuild .targets files have been programmed to look for certain file locations in the registry. I suggest asking this question in the MSBuild or one of the Language specific forums (C#, VB, C++).


    My blog: blog.jessehouwing.nl

    • Marked as answer by 27Prac Thursday, November 1, 2012 12:42 PM
    Thursday, November 1, 2012 8:31 AM

All replies

  • You can indeed install FxCop from Widows SDK. It contains a limited subset of the rules that are shipped as part of Visual Studio Premium and Ultimate. (a number of rules that rely on the Data Flow Engine are not part of the SDK version of FxCop).

    There are a couple of ways you can then run these tools:

    • Simplest is to open up the GUI application that is installed as part of FxCop.
    • You can call fxcopcmd from the commandline
    • You can use the msbuildcommunitytasks fxcop task to call FxCop from the msbuild process. Define your own targets file to have it called
    • There is a Visual Studio Add-in (at least for 2010) that you can use to call FxCop directly from Visual Studio.

    My blog: blog.jessehouwing.nl

    Wednesday, October 31, 2012 12:09 PM
  • Thanks for the reply. I will be glad if you can answer my below questions

    I have done settings to  use the latest  Windows SDK Configuration Tool in Visual Studio 2008 as discussed on the link http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff660764.aspx. I have two questions regarding this

    1. Does the latest Windows SDK 7.1 contains the /analyze feature. I want to use this feature in my VS Professional Edition.

    2. How do I know that following the  steps on the link posted above , my VS is using the  latest compiler from the SDK and not  the native VS compiler.

    Thursday, November 1, 2012 6:24 AM
  • 1) Yes The Windows SDK ships with FxCop 10.0, which is the same engine used by the Visual Studio Code Analysis feature. Though it doesn't have all the rules the Visual Studio Ultimate edition has. Download and install it as follows.

    2) That is unrelated to the Code Analysis features in Visual Studio. As far as I know, Windows SDK versions are installed side by side (you can have multiple installed). How or why Visual Studio will chose one over the other is unknown to me. I suspect it's driven by the .NET Framework version you select and the way the MsBuild .targets files have been programmed to look for certain file locations in the registry. I suggest asking this question in the MSBuild or one of the Language specific forums (C#, VB, C++).


    My blog: blog.jessehouwing.nl

    • Marked as answer by 27Prac Thursday, November 1, 2012 12:42 PM
    Thursday, November 1, 2012 8:31 AM