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Outdoor / Tented lighting experience? Sunlight mitigation ideas? RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are working on a Kinect For Windows experience that will be deployed in a tent, outdoors in a park.

    The expectation is that the experience, which relies on skeleton detection, will function during the day time.

    Obviously this is not an ideal situation and we are having trouble getting the skeleton recognition to behave correctly with daytime light illuminating / leaking through the tent walls.

    Has anyone had any successful experience with this situation? Any reliable solutions with dealing with the daylight? Any creative solutions other than putting up a solid material to block the sunlight?

    Additionally, is there any detailed technical documentation which outlines the specific operating environment for the Kinect? The Microsoft Surf... I mean Pixelsense Venue Readiness Guidelines are a great example of this: http://www.samsunglfd.com/download/attachFile.download.do?attId=50


    • Edited by dt_cc Wednesday, July 25, 2012 5:55 PM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 5:51 PM

All replies

  • As this has been an issue i put it as most important things on my thread i started for kinect team as to putting up an sunlight level for how much the kinect can take.

    P.S. I have an idea try if using for flying robot have the robot go parallel to the sun towards the right or left if the sun is pointing down on it that way the sun is not directly in the kinects field of view. This is temp until kinect team gives guidelines for outside.


    Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth. - "Sherlock holmes" "speak softly and carry a big stick" - theodore roosevelt. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering - Yoda. Blog - http://jefferycarlsonblog.blogspot.com/


    • Edited by The Thinker Wednesday, July 25, 2012 7:42 PM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 7:41 PM
  • Hi,

    I built this for one of our clients: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQi1g0IoTr4 which worked in full-sunshine in the middle of Sydney (so very bright) as well as of an evening. It doesn't use a Kinect, but a competitor ToF-style camera from Panasonic. We have tested Kinect is various Australian conditions and the ambient IR in sunlight essentially blinds the depth capabilities and thus you get no inputs.

    Depending on what you are after you can revet back to 2D technology and use computer vision libraries to take an input from a high-frame camera, use some dynamic background substraction trickey, and skeletonise the input. This works for basic gesture inputs and by using a camera which can switch to IR you can also get a good outcome for both day and night.

    For our scenario we needed to utilise depth as well, as we went with the Panasonic solution, installed it in a weather proof casing and built a library on top of it. I abstracted out the application so I could switch between the APIs for Panasonic and Kinect for Windows so we can use a different sensor based on the placement. The Panasonic cameras are really expensive so when we could use a Kinect - such as for instore we did.

    I'm more than happy to help you design the solution you need, so just e-mail me what you are trying to achieve and I can point you in the right direction.

    Thanks,
    Lewis


    Follow Me on Twitter: @LewisBenge Or check out my blog: http://www.lewisbenge.net

    Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:32 AM
  • Their was a thread i helped on a similar topic and they used a material i found that camera people use to get those special shots without changing their camera or using the computer and only want infrared to go through the material and nothing else.

    Also, you might be able to wait till a certain time in the day and setup by a tree that will provide shade to protect from sun.

    I work at a K-12 school as IT where demands are always changing so i might need to do what your doing in the future and have the kinect in the sunlight. Maybe kinect team can get a third party or make the item theirselfs to make a special filter to put over the camera to block sunlight and still allow the kinect to function? 

    P.S. some of security cameras we have at the school are panasonic and are not as programmable.


    Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth. - "Sherlock holmes" "speak softly and carry a big stick" - theodore roosevelt. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering - Yoda. Blog - http://jefferycarlsonblog.blogspot.com/






    • Edited by The Thinker Tuesday, January 29, 2013 3:49 PM
    Thursday, July 26, 2012 11:45 AM
  • Thanks for the help. In our case, we were able to solve the problem by mounting our cameras at a higher location (approx. 77") and tilting down -27 degrees. At this angle we are still able to track the user, but aren't receiving the direct sunlight.
    • Proposed as answer by The Thinker Tuesday, January 29, 2013 3:50 PM
    Thursday, July 26, 2012 3:17 PM
  • yes so my idea worked with modification. You had it pointed down by a tree or other lcoation at an angle instead of parallel. 

    "I have an idea try if using for flying robot have the robot go parallel to the sun towards the right or left if the sun is pointing down on it that way the sun is not directly in the kinects field of view. This is temp until kinect team gives guidelines for outside. "

    "you might be able to wait till a certain time in the day and setup by a tree that will provide shade to protect from sun"



    Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth. - "Sherlock holmes" "speak softly and carry a big stick" - theodore roosevelt. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering - Yoda. Blog - http://jefferycarlsonblog.blogspot.com/






    • Edited by The Thinker Thursday, July 26, 2012 5:45 PM
    Thursday, July 26, 2012 5:38 PM
  • Here is a suggestion from another person:

    There is a greenhouse shade cloth called aluminet that will block 70% of the infrared.  This may be sufficient for Kinect, but I have not tried it.

    http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/70-percent-aluminet-shade-curtain/shade-cloth

    • Proposed as answer by The Thinker Tuesday, January 29, 2013 3:50 PM
    Thursday, July 26, 2012 7:32 PM
  • hi, lewis , Panasonic ToF Camera...  that's really expensive..right?

    I'm a device.

    Monday, January 28, 2013 12:32 PM