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Authentication RRS feed

  • Question

  • What is the difference between SQL and Windows authentication?

    Md. shams

    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:25 AM

Answers

  • windows (integrated) allows windows to authenticate the user and the server accepts those credentials.

    SQL uses a username and password and the server authenticates independent of windows.

    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:27 AM
  • Windows Authentication - SQL Uses Windows Credentials to Log In. A user simply logs in to their local machine and Active Directory will authenticate them so they no longer need to use their credentials to access other areas, such as SQL. When you enter SQL Management Studio for example there are two options, one is to use Windows Authentication (which uses your current credentials through Windows) or SQL Authentication.

    SQL Authentication - SQL Uses SQL-Specific Roles and Login Credentials (Username and Password). SQL Authentication differs from Windows Authentication in that a user's credentials are not used through Active Directory and won't be used to access SQL (or your Database) and instead the user must provide login credentials to access the database.


    Akshay Pate Server Administrator

    • Proposed as answer by Akshay Pate Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:29 AM
    • Marked as answer by Md. Shams Sultan Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:28 AM
  • FWIW, this is a good primer on security in SQL Server: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/4433.database-engine-permission-basics.aspx

    Tibor Karaszi, SQL Server MVP | web | blog

    Wednesday, November 13, 2013 3:15 PM

All replies

  • windows (integrated) allows windows to authenticate the user and the server accepts those credentials.

    SQL uses a username and password and the server authenticates independent of windows.

    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:27 AM
  • Windows Authentication - SQL Uses Windows Credentials to Log In. A user simply logs in to their local machine and Active Directory will authenticate them so they no longer need to use their credentials to access other areas, such as SQL. When you enter SQL Management Studio for example there are two options, one is to use Windows Authentication (which uses your current credentials through Windows) or SQL Authentication.

    SQL Authentication - SQL Uses SQL-Specific Roles and Login Credentials (Username and Password). SQL Authentication differs from Windows Authentication in that a user's credentials are not used through Active Directory and won't be used to access SQL (or your Database) and instead the user must provide login credentials to access the database.


    Akshay Pate Server Administrator

    • Proposed as answer by Akshay Pate Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:29 AM
    • Marked as answer by Md. Shams Sultan Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 9:28 AM
  • FWIW, this is a good primer on security in SQL Server: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/4433.database-engine-permission-basics.aspx

    Tibor Karaszi, SQL Server MVP | web | blog

    Wednesday, November 13, 2013 3:15 PM