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I thought Bird's Eye View was getting fixed? RRS feed

  • Question

  • The ONLY reason for me to give your website a hit (the reason you are in business) is to check out the birds eye view on your maps. This is exclusive to your maps. Now that you have changed your website, I no longer have a reason to visit it. I try to look at a birds eye view of Atlantic City, a very popular location within the United States, and I can't look at a single part of the boardwalk. Classic, another online case of if something isn't broke, don't fix it!
    • Edited by Rich Long Thursday, February 22, 2018 9:35 AM
    Thursday, February 22, 2018 9:35 AM

Answers

  • Hi, there forums are for the Bing Maps Enterprise developer API's which is what the focus of the Bing Map business is. I believe your question is in regards to the Bing Maps consumer website. There is a bunch of threads outlining what has changed and some insights into the product roadmap. Here is a quick summary:

    Bing Maps changed data providers for Birdseye imagery for a couple of reasons, one of the main ones being that the extreme cost of this feature doesn't justify the volume of usage this feature gets. A fairly small percentage of users use birdseye regularly. The new data provider is able to provide higher resolution imagery at a much more economical rate. There initial coverage is less than what Bing Maps had with the previous data provider and the new data provider is working on filling in many of the key areas. We should start seeing new imagery being rolled out into these areas over the next few months. That said, there was a lot of birdseye imagery in remote areas which very few users have ever viewed, even the old data provider wasn't updating these areas. As such, many remote areas that previously had birdseye imagery may not get coverage in the future. You may ask why we didn't wait until the new data provider had coverage that was more on par with our previous coverage, this came down to a few factors such as contract renewal dates and extremely high costs.


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    Thursday, February 22, 2018 6:16 PM

All replies

  • Hi, there forums are for the Bing Maps Enterprise developer API's which is what the focus of the Bing Map business is. I believe your question is in regards to the Bing Maps consumer website. There is a bunch of threads outlining what has changed and some insights into the product roadmap. Here is a quick summary:

    Bing Maps changed data providers for Birdseye imagery for a couple of reasons, one of the main ones being that the extreme cost of this feature doesn't justify the volume of usage this feature gets. A fairly small percentage of users use birdseye regularly. The new data provider is able to provide higher resolution imagery at a much more economical rate. There initial coverage is less than what Bing Maps had with the previous data provider and the new data provider is working on filling in many of the key areas. We should start seeing new imagery being rolled out into these areas over the next few months. That said, there was a lot of birdseye imagery in remote areas which very few users have ever viewed, even the old data provider wasn't updating these areas. As such, many remote areas that previously had birdseye imagery may not get coverage in the future. You may ask why we didn't wait until the new data provider had coverage that was more on par with our previous coverage, this came down to a few factors such as contract renewal dates and extremely high costs.


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    Thursday, February 22, 2018 6:16 PM
  • Hi, Please let me know who the old provider of maps is -- I would like to see if they have the maps available.  Your new data provider is the worst, no offense. I miss Birdseye.
    Thursday, May 10, 2018 10:35 AM
  • The old provider is Pictometry. The new data provider is collecting data and providing a big update in a couple of months.

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    Thursday, May 10, 2018 4:03 PM
  • I can't agree more with this complaint. You have ruined Bingmaps. I used to use Birdview a lot for Central America, but now it's impossible. The UK has nothing to do with it.

    The only image available for the region I am interested in (streetview) is covered with clouds, which leaves me with no image at all. You have not improved Bingmaps, on the contrary.

    The least you can do is remove the layer of clouds or just simply restore Birdsview (that had no clouds).

    Friday, May 25, 2018 6:55 PM
  • I haven't used bing maps in a long time because of the removal of the bird's eye view feature. Sad that we've taken a step back, even the old imagery was better than nothing.
    Wednesday, July 25, 2018 7:15 PM
  • The high costs thing is a lame answer. There is NO reason to remove the old images until/unless you have new images to replace it. That cost has already been spent. This is just yet another way that Microsoft simply has no idea how to deal with the mobile generation. This is the ONE thing that Bing Maps had that was better than Google Maps. And you get rid of it! Insane.
    • Edited by Kerket Tuesday, August 14, 2018 7:37 PM
    Tuesday, August 14, 2018 7:33 PM
  • The high costs thing is a lame answer. There is NO reason to remove the old images until/unless you have new images to replace it. That cost has already been spent. This is just yet another way that Microsoft simply has no idea how to deal with the mobile generation. This is the ONE thing that Bing Maps had that was better than Google Maps. And you get rid of it! Insane.
    I too am disappointed that Bird's Eye view is no longer available. But I cannot agree that Microsoft has any obligation at all to provide services that are apparently not sufficiently valued by customers to warrant the costs. (Costs are not already 'spent'. Images like this are obtained under license for a limited period of time and at expiry of he licensing period a licensee is no longer permitted to use them.)  This is pretty much a zero sum game.  Other stakeholders suffer if one group is unduly treated well. For example. if MSFT does not continues to pay a lot for images that are viewed by only a few customers,  profits for shareholders could be higher and/or  wages for employees could be higher and/or prices charged to other customers could be lower and/or charitable donations could be higher. 

    If you believe the service is vital and should be provided as a public service, then please feel free to lobby politicians to raise taxes on all of us to pay for it. I will be happy to join you in such lobbying.  
    Saturday, December 8, 2018 4:59 PM
  • Hi, there forums are for the Bing Maps Enterprise developer API's which is what the focus of the Bing Map business is. I believe your question is in regards to the Bing Maps consumer website. There is a bunch of threads outlining what has changed and some insights into the product roadmap. Here is a quick summary:

    Bing Maps changed data providers for Birdseye imagery for a couple of reasons, one of the main ones being that the extreme cost of this feature doesn't justify the volume of usage this feature gets. A fairly small percentage of users use birdseye regularly. The new data provider is able to provide higher resolution imagery at a much more economical rate. There initial coverage is less than what Bing Maps had with the previous data provider and the new data provider is working on filling in many of the key areas. We should start seeing new imagery being rolled out into these areas over the next few months. That said, there was a lot of birdseye imagery in remote areas which very few users have ever viewed, even the old data provider wasn't updating these areas. As such, many remote areas that previously had birdseye imagery may not get coverage in the future. You may ask why we didn't wait until the new data provider had coverage that was more on par with our previous coverage, this came down to a few factors such as contract renewal dates and extremely high costs.


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    What a lesson this is to remind us that "free" doesn't equal "entitled".  Still, I'm extremely disappointed.  It was especially the remote areas, e.g. Death Valley, that were so much fun to look at.
    Tuesday, August 4, 2020 8:29 PM
  • High costs, license fees, server maintenance, I get it.  But since you took away most of the Bird's Eye coverage geographically speaking, how about allowing us to use an alternative product like Google Earth on Microsoft branded tablets?   Google Earth isn't as good as Bing Maps Bird's Eye View in terms of image quality, but it's still way better than nothing.
    Tuesday, August 4, 2020 9:11 PM
  • Hi Folks,

    You are adding to a VERY OLD post.  I recommend looking at our blog at https://blogs.bing.com/maps/2020-05/did-somebody-say-more-birds-eye-imagery  as we are collecting some new Birdseye but as you note it is expensive and time consuming.  Also the oblique fly overs require a clear day, permission to fly that area and likely other restrictions I can't guess.  The folks that know are https://www.vexcel-imaging.com/ and they are the partner that does the imagery collection that is used for Birdseye views.  Essentially, if they successfully collect a region then Microsoft can purchase it.

    If your company needs specific imagery coverage, you can go directly to Vexcel to get the details on what would be required to collect the imagery for your area of interest.

    For the best experience of our 3D data on Windows Tablets, install the Windows Map App from the store and choose "3D Cities" from the "..." menu.

    Sincerely,

    IoTGirl

    Wednesday, August 5, 2020 10:42 PM
    Owner