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Windows Licenses with "MSDN Operating Systems" subscription level RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm looking for a cost-effective solution for testing my web-applications in various versions of Windows and Internet Explorer. The MSDN Operating Systems package looks perfect, but I wanted to clarify licensing issues.

    I'll be using VMWare to provide a virtual environment for Windows. I'd like to setup several different virtual machines (Windows 2000 + IE5, Windows XP + IE6, Windows XP + IE7, Windows XP + IE8, Vista + IE7, etc.) These virtual machines would be running in tandem on a single physical host, used by a single developer

    I posed this situation to a phone rep earlier today, who claimed I could install and activate an unlimited number of Windows XP/Vista installs while running them simultaneously in virtual machines. That seemed too good to be true, which is why I'm posting here Smile Will I have a problem with multiple installs of Windows XP/Vista in virtual machines? More importantly, is this behavior consistent with the terms of an MSDN membership?

    Thank you for taking the time to answer my question.

    (Before anyone suggests the Internet Explorer Application Compatibility VPC Image, the EULA forbids conversion of the disk image to another format. Life is hard)
    Tuesday, May 20, 2008 1:49 AM

Answers

  • The MSDN Operating Systems subscription fits nicely for this type of scenario.  The use rights allow you to install the software on any number of machines for design, development, test, and demonstration of your programs.  Each other person using the software would need an MSDN license as well.

     

    The OS's will each require a product key that you can get from the MSDN subscriber download site as you probably already know.  Different products have different limits on the number of activations, and once you run out of activations you'll need to call MSDN Subscriber support to get another key.  If you can avoid activating (because you don't need the build longer than 30 days), then you'll save yourself some time.  But either way your MSDN license entitles you to install the software as many times as you need and we'll provide you the product keys for this.

    Wednesday, May 28, 2008 10:14 PM

All replies

  • I am not a licensing whiz, but let me see if I can ping someone who can help.

     

    Thanks

     

     

    Wednesday, May 28, 2008 9:57 PM
  • The MSDN Operating Systems subscription fits nicely for this type of scenario.  The use rights allow you to install the software on any number of machines for design, development, test, and demonstration of your programs.  Each other person using the software would need an MSDN license as well.

     

    The OS's will each require a product key that you can get from the MSDN subscriber download site as you probably already know.  Different products have different limits on the number of activations, and once you run out of activations you'll need to call MSDN Subscriber support to get another key.  If you can avoid activating (because you don't need the build longer than 30 days), then you'll save yourself some time.  But either way your MSDN license entitles you to install the software as many times as you need and we'll provide you the product keys for this.

    Wednesday, May 28, 2008 10:14 PM
  • James,
    Can you provide a link to the licensing information on Microsoft's site that covers the "any number of machines" language?
    Thursday, May 7, 2009 3:25 PM
  • Greg:

    Please see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/cc150618.aspx.  As is noted in this article, this pertains only to software provided in the MSDN Subscription.   See the links at the bottom of this article for even more specifics.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    MSDN and TechNet Subscriptions Support
    Friday, May 8, 2009 6:16 PM
  • The verbage used at the above link is a  little disturbing to me. It would be interesting to get a clarification.

    For instance, I have a laptop I bought in May with Vista Ultimate 64 bit. On this laptop I do a variety of development, documenting, checking email, etc for windows and embedded non-windows embedded stuff. I also play the occiasionaly game of spider solitaire, browse the internet, etc.

    So if I read/understand the above license correctly, I can't use my MSDN license to upgrade my laptop to Windows 7 since "checking email", writing documents, playing games, etc is  not allowed under the license agreement.


    Am I really reading this correctly?


    Thursday, November 26, 2009 3:26 AM
  • for test acceptance user need msdn os platrofm subs ? 
    Friday, May 13, 2016 9:34 AM
  • Hello,

    Does the "MSDN OS" subscription still exist?

    I can't find how much it costs nor where to buy it...

    What's the current cheapest option to test MS Operating Systems?

    Thanks!

    Friday, April 19, 2019 1:19 PM