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Is .NET Really Necessary for Running a Program? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Yes, Is it really necessary? If I copy some .NET DLLs to my program folder, still need to install .NET?
    • Edited by Justin.NET Monday, December 8, 2008 3:12 PM
    Friday, December 5, 2008 9:29 PM

Answers

  • Yes and no. You should not be sending the other guy and .NET Library dlls. Most likely nothing bad will happen but its best to install it via the MS supplied setup program which by the way is free so there is no problem in getting it from the web.

    If you are not using any 3.5 specific features like LINQ you migh just downgrade your application to 2.0. Then most people will be able to run it.

    Go to My Project > Compile > Advanced Compile Options > Target framework combobox.
    Monday, December 8, 2008 1:38 PM
  • You might reference a small part of the framework. The small parts you reference need access to the rest of the framework and you have a problem. Its installed on your computer so the apparent reference you see in your References tab seems to surfice but because its installed on your computer the CLR will automatically load the other assemblies from the GAC.

    So when you find what you think you need and send it to your friends they wont have that special library that the framework requests.

    Actually I dont care what you do. When I send .NET programs to friends I ask them to install .NET because I dont what to be brothered with errors caused by missing assemblies.

    I recommend installing. You keep doing what you want. I can almost garantee you will run into trouble.

    See ya.
    Tuesday, December 9, 2008 6:41 AM

All replies

  • Yes.  The .Net framework must be installed to use .Net dlls.
    Sunday, December 7, 2008 9:26 AM
  • I have given a program to my friend. I guess there was only a .Net Framework 2.0 on his system. But my program also was using some references from .Net 3.5. Actually It was .Net 3.5 based. Anyway, he told me it does not work on him. After that, I sent a needed .Net 3.5 DLL to him, he putted it to program's working directory. And so program worked. So now do you think this method is unsafe? Or what?


    • Edited by Justin.NET Monday, July 13, 2009 1:10 AM
    Monday, December 8, 2008 1:27 AM
  • Yes and no. You should not be sending the other guy and .NET Library dlls. Most likely nothing bad will happen but its best to install it via the MS supplied setup program which by the way is free so there is no problem in getting it from the web.

    If you are not using any 3.5 specific features like LINQ you migh just downgrade your application to 2.0. Then most people will be able to run it.

    Go to My Project > Compile > Advanced Compile Options > Target framework combobox.
    Monday, December 8, 2008 1:38 PM
  • Holm76 said:

    Yes and no. You should not be sending the other guy and .NET Library dlls. Most likely nothing bad will happen but its best to install it via the MS supplied setup program which by the way is free so there is no problem in getting it from the web.


    Yes .NET is free. I know it of course. But if I use only a few references from .NET, why does user has to install the complete .Net package? Actually, this is my question.


    Holm76 said:

    If you are not using any 3.5 specific features like LINQ you migh just downgrade your application to 2.0. Then most people will be able to run it.

    Go to My Project > Compile > Advanced Compile Options > Target framework combobox.

    I'm talking in general. Not for a specific project. And also I know these.
    Monday, December 8, 2008 3:02 PM
  • Justin .NET,

    You can use a .NET dll and not even have the .NET Framework installed.  Just do like you said, put the dll in the same directory as the application.  It works for me.

    Best Regards,

    Adjutor
    Monday, December 8, 2008 3:39 PM
  • Yes, you need to have the .net framework installed.....
    Hector Minaya
    Microsoft Visual Basic MVP | Speaker INETA Latam | MCSD | MCT | MCTS : SQL Server
    Monday, December 8, 2008 6:35 PM
  • You might reference a small part of the framework. The small parts you reference need access to the rest of the framework and you have a problem. Its installed on your computer so the apparent reference you see in your References tab seems to surfice but because its installed on your computer the CLR will automatically load the other assemblies from the GAC.

    So when you find what you think you need and send it to your friends they wont have that special library that the framework requests.

    Actually I dont care what you do. When I send .NET programs to friends I ask them to install .NET because I dont what to be brothered with errors caused by missing assemblies.

    I recommend installing. You keep doing what you want. I can almost garantee you will run into trouble.

    See ya.
    Tuesday, December 9, 2008 6:41 AM
  • The EULA probably disallows it, as well.


    Thanks,
    Corey Furman
    Code Slabs
    ______________________________________________________
    Please mark posts as answer or helpful when they are.
    Tuesday, December 9, 2008 1:26 PM