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Ability of WES7 platform to accept device drivers written for Windows 7 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a question about the capabilities of a WES7 platform. We are currently using regular Windows for our otherwise embedded product, one of the main restrictions being the need to have device drivers for a variety of data acquisition devices installed on the system. My question is: can you easily build a WES7 release that will support the ability to install any device driver that was written for Windows 7? I am particularly interested in the x64 version. We do not use the majority of features in general-purpose Windows and would like to be able to use the much thinner WES7, the lower price also being a nice incentive. Thank you for your responses.
    Kamen


    Using VS 2005 SP1, native/managed C++ and C#, about to transition from 32-bit Windows XP to 64-bit Windows 7 and VS 2010; Mountain time zone.
    • Edited by Kamen Thursday, April 14, 2011 8:00 PM
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 3:25 PM

Answers

  • All drivers written for Windows 7 will work on WES7 as well.
    The OS uses the exact same code base and adds some special embedded
    features.
     
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:59 PM
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 3:58 PM
  • To add on to Franz' answer - you also need to make sure to have the right OS feature package to support the drivers in the image.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:59 PM
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 6:02 PM
    Moderator
  • There is a simpler route, if you can install Windows 7 on the target system with all of the drivers and run TAP.exe. Doing this basic step will help prove Windows 7 and all the drivers are working properly. TAP will create a PMQ file that list the PnP IDs for all the drivers. You can than import the PMQ into ICE, which should pull in the necessary driver packages - it is better than guessing the ones needed. My book cover the step-by-step process. 

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Friday, April 15, 2011 3:24 PM
    Friday, April 15, 2011 12:24 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • All drivers written for Windows 7 will work on WES7 as well.
    The OS uses the exact same code base and adds some special embedded
    features.
     
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:59 PM
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 3:58 PM
  • To add on to Franz' answer - you also need to make sure to have the right OS feature package to support the drivers in the image.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:59 PM
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 6:02 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you, guys. Sean, I am not sure I understand your response - could you , please, elaborate? Do you mean that the feature package you are referring to (what exactly are those?) is needed if I wanted to build the drivers I want right into the OS image, e.g., so I don't have to install them each time I deploy a computer? I do have some experience with OS preinstallation (OPK), but I have never built a componentized OS. My main concern is having something that will work but from which I could also remove unnecessary features (anything not needed in an industrial environment). By the way, our main DAQ vendor is National Instruments and they do not supply regular device drivers, they only give you a massive installer (over a GB of data) to deploy onto the computer.
    Kamen


    Using VS 2005 SP1, native/managed C++ and C#, about to transition from 32-bit Windows XP to 64-bit Windows 7 and VS 2010; Mountain time zone.

     


    Thursday, April 14, 2011 7:53 PM
  • Because the OS is componentized, you will need the features to run on top of the drivers. You could have an audio driver, but without the Audio and Video engines, Microsoft UAA, and Trusted Audio packages, the audio functionality will not work.

    -Sean

     


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 8:09 PM
    Moderator
  • As a starting point, I advise you to add all feature packages, resolve dependencies, install your drivers and see if things are working as expected on the runtime.

    Ivan

    Thursday, April 14, 2011 11:04 PM
  • There is a simpler route, if you can install Windows 7 on the target system with all of the drivers and run TAP.exe. Doing this basic step will help prove Windows 7 and all the drivers are working properly. TAP will create a PMQ file that list the PnP IDs for all the drivers. You can than import the PMQ into ICE, which should pull in the necessary driver packages - it is better than guessing the ones needed. My book cover the step-by-step process. 

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - ProGuide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, WEPOS / POS for .NET Step-by-Step
    • Marked as answer by Kamen Friday, April 15, 2011 3:24 PM
    Friday, April 15, 2011 12:24 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you very much, guys. Sean, your specific advice is highly appreciated, I might look into using your book and services when the time comes.

    Kamen


    Using VS 2005 SP1, native/managed C++ and C#, about to transition from 32-bit Windows XP to 64-bit Windows 7 and VS 2010; Mountain time zone.
    Friday, April 15, 2011 3:23 PM