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Send Outlook Appointment or Outlook Task from SMTP? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all,

    I'm writing an application that sends mail using an SMTP package.  I'd like to know if I can generate an Outlook Appointment or an Outlook Task.  Can these be sent by SMTP?  What is the format that I should use to construct the message?

    None of the technology that I am using is Microsoft's.

    Cheers,

        Don
    Wednesday, April 9, 2008 8:16 PM

Answers

  • Hi Don,

     

    I you plan on using native MIME using the existing standards, you can construct an iCal meeting request using MIME and send that to Exchange but to be clear, this is a meeting request/response/cancellation and NOT an appointment.  You can generate an iCal attachment that represents an appointment or a collection of appointments (i.e. a calendar) as well as a meeting request/response/cancellation.

     

    You could also generate a MIME message with Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) to accomplish the same goals as above for meeting requests.  Task requests are not mapped to any native MIME constructs in any version of Outlook or Exchange.  However, I believe a TNEF could be used to transmit task requests over MIME.


    Cheers,

     

    Tom Devey - MSFT

    Friday, April 11, 2008 4:48 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Albert - It appears that you asked this same question in a separate thread which has been answered, so I am marking this thread as answered. Please feel free to re-submit the question if you still need assistance.

    Thanks - Chris
    • Marked as answer by Chris Mullaney Tuesday, September 30, 2008 9:55 PM
    Tuesday, September 30, 2008 9:55 PM
  • Hi Will,

    I got feedback from development that the specifications already have the necessary information available.  In section 4.1 of [MS-OXOTASK] shows the properties needed in a task request, and the document [MS-OXTNEF] describes how to serialize them.

    As an example it is pretty easy to generate if you have access to an Exchange account.  Here are the steps that I use to generate a sample TNEF file.

    1. Log onto an Exchange account of your choice with Outlook
    2. Create a new task
    3. Open the new task and click Assign
    4. Add a Hotmail email account that I am an owner to the To line
    5. Right-Click the email address to the just added and access Outlook Properties
      (Note: Outlook 2010, open the contact card, then pull down the menu from the icon on far right and chose Outlook Properties)
    6. Change the Internet format to "Send using Outlook Rich Text Format". 
      This will send a task request in TNEF format to the Hotmail account
    7. Log in to Hotmail, open the message, pull down the menu under Reply and choose “view message source”

    Note: You can use other email providers and clients of your choice.  You just need a mechanism to view the message source. I use this technique to help me reverse things with TNEF.

    Hope this helps.


    Senior C
    Monday, March 21, 2011 9:48 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Don,

     

    I you plan on using native MIME using the existing standards, you can construct an iCal meeting request using MIME and send that to Exchange but to be clear, this is a meeting request/response/cancellation and NOT an appointment.  You can generate an iCal attachment that represents an appointment or a collection of appointments (i.e. a calendar) as well as a meeting request/response/cancellation.

     

    You could also generate a MIME message with Transport Neutral Encapsulation Format (TNEF) to accomplish the same goals as above for meeting requests.  Task requests are not mapped to any native MIME constructs in any version of Outlook or Exchange.  However, I believe a TNEF could be used to transmit task requests over MIME.


    Cheers,

     

    Tom Devey - MSFT

    Friday, April 11, 2008 4:48 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for your postings.  This is not in the scope of our forum and will be moved to the Exchange Server Protocols forum for visibility

    Tuesday, April 15, 2008 3:44 PM
  • Hi Tom

     

    We've got a similar problem, only we're using MS technologies. From a document handling application we need to send Outlook tasks to other users on the Exchange server. This is no problem using the Outlook COM interface. As it is done from a server however we need to use some other technology such as CDOSYS or system.net

     

    However there is close to no information available on this subject. How can it be done?

     

    Sincerely

     

    Albert Jensen

     

    Friday, May 16, 2008 7:09 AM
  • Hi Albert - It appears that you asked this same question in a separate thread which has been answered, so I am marking this thread as answered. Please feel free to re-submit the question if you still need assistance.

    Thanks - Chris
    • Marked as answer by Chris Mullaney Tuesday, September 30, 2008 9:55 PM
    Tuesday, September 30, 2008 9:55 PM
  • Hey Chris, so how about a link to the "separate thread" you speak of? There's no point in marking it answered if anyone getting here can't find the answer...
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 4:29 PM
  • Microsoft TechNet > Forums Home > Exchange Server > Development -> thread is the answered that Chris was referring to in her post.  Thanks for the feedback.


    Developer Consultant
    Thursday, February 12, 2009 5:19 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Tom,

    You mentioned generating a MIME message with TNEF to transmit task requests.  I have looked all over the place and can't find any examples of what this file needs to look like in order to generate a task.  Can you provide examples or point me to anything that describes how one would generate a task? I did find this information on the Microsoft site, but I'd like to see an actual example of a file that generates a task.  Thanks

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 9:39 PM
  • Hi Will,

    Thank you for your question.  Looking at the TNEF documentation I do think adding an additional example[s] would be helpful.  I will put together an example and post it.


    Senior Consultant
    Thursday, February 10, 2011 5:41 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Will,

    I got feedback from development that the specifications already have the necessary information available.  In section 4.1 of [MS-OXOTASK] shows the properties needed in a task request, and the document [MS-OXTNEF] describes how to serialize them.

    As an example it is pretty easy to generate if you have access to an Exchange account.  Here are the steps that I use to generate a sample TNEF file.

    1. Log onto an Exchange account of your choice with Outlook
    2. Create a new task
    3. Open the new task and click Assign
    4. Add a Hotmail email account that I am an owner to the To line
    5. Right-Click the email address to the just added and access Outlook Properties
      (Note: Outlook 2010, open the contact card, then pull down the menu from the icon on far right and chose Outlook Properties)
    6. Change the Internet format to "Send using Outlook Rich Text Format". 
      This will send a task request in TNEF format to the Hotmail account
    7. Log in to Hotmail, open the message, pull down the menu under Reply and choose “view message source”

    Note: You can use other email providers and clients of your choice.  You just need a mechanism to view the message source. I use this technique to help me reverse things with TNEF.

    Hope this helps.


    Senior C
    Monday, March 21, 2011 9:48 PM
    Moderator
  • Hey Tom.

    Has there been any further development with this? I've been through as much of the documentation on MSDN as I can find, and have yet to see an actual code example of how to generate TNEF output, or what a sample TNEF output file/MIME object should look like.

    It would be incredibly useful if we could get some examples of how this works in practice rather than just trying to wade through the specification docs.

    Cheers

    /H

    Thursday, March 1, 2012 4:04 AM
  • I agree that this would be incredibly useful to have some examples about how this is used from a practical standpoint.

    I will pass this feedback along to the protocol documentation team as they are always looking for opportunities to create what we refer to as non-normative content to help with the solution development. 

    Anything specific that you want covered in details outside of your feedback above?

    Thank you for your feedback.


    Senior Program Manager

    Thursday, March 1, 2012 6:30 PM
    Moderator