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Documentation for this effect?

    Question

  • Now that I've solved my problem, I want to find out where this sort of thing is documented -- there must be other hidden gems in there that I want to learn.  But so far, I haven't seen anywhere in MSDN that even hints that this is the behavior of the system (which is why it looks like "totally weird and very frustrating bug" and not "awesome bit of clever work that Microsoft is doing on our behalf")

    I had been seeing a weirdness when I’ve been creating the Windows version of the Control Program for BERO: it would work, but would fade to black.  Switching around in the app would pop it back to being lit up, but then it would fade to black again.  A program that does this isn’t shippable.

    To debug the problem, I first just poked at the program, turning things on and off, and noting that if I made a second copy of the control for the BERO Robot, the screen stayed nice and bright.  But this wasn’t really a clue.  Then I removed tons of stuff from the UI and popped in a colored rectangle.  And that’s when it got really weird: if the rectangle was large, it stayed bright.  If it was small, it faded to black.

    This was strange enough to warrant creating a trivial repro program.  From Visual Studio I created a new default project, popped in my rectangle – and no dimming!  Then I found the cause of the problem!  Among the poking around, I replaced the normal default grid:

    <Grid Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">

    with

    <Grid Background="Black">

    That turned the problem on and off!  As long as my background is the ThemeResource, the screen works fine.  If it’s not, I get the fade to black.  But if strongly depends on the contents of the screen.  A big blue rectangle?  No fading.  A small one?  Fades to black.  In-between?  Fades to dark gray. (!! what?  how??)

    I’m sure this must be documented somewhere. The question is, where?  Can someone find me a link to a nice MSDN page that talks about this fade-to-black effect, why it's there, and what other nifty effects I should watch for?

    Saturday, May 17, 2014 7:09 PM

Answers

  • Hah!  I had been assuming this was some kind of fancy setting in XAML.  In reality, it's looks like my monitor was "helpfully" adjusting the brightness on me.

    A pox on on "helpful" technology!

    Monday, May 19, 2014 2:03 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    According to your description. I do not quite understand what do you mean. You should share a reproduce project to skyDrive so that we can better understand your problem.

    Best Wishes!


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    Monday, May 19, 2014 2:06 AM
  • Hah!  I had been assuming this was some kind of fancy setting in XAML.  In reality, it's looks like my monitor was "helpfully" adjusting the brightness on me.

    A pox on on "helpful" technology!

    Monday, May 19, 2014 2:03 PM