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Is WinRT to replace .NET and Win32? RRS feed

  • Question

  • EDIT: changed type to discussion

    sorry for deleting some of my messages, they looked silly since I'm new to WinRT and didn't know what it even was (still have many questions).  But since digesting more information on this I had to make some corrections

    The goal of this discussion is to try to determine whether WinRT would replace .NET/Win32.

    Even though WinRT apps are not desktop apps, who said they should be to replace desktop apps?  WinRT looks similar to .NET, particularly in gathering all languages under one roof, using purely object-oriented libraries.  It also has improvements in interaction between managed and unmanaged code, rendering P/Invoke obsolete in comparison.  It is native API unlike .NET.  All this and more, makes me wonder if WinRT is actually a runtime and programming model that would eventually replace .NET and Win32.  It is native API, something .NET lacked in performance, it is also more consistent and better structured than Win32.  In other words it takes all the benefits of both .NET and Win32, combines them and leaves .NET and Win32 behind.

    What do you think?





    • Changed type ColdBackup Sunday, December 2, 2012 7:11 PM
    • Edited by ColdBackup Sunday, December 2, 2012 7:23 PM
    • Changed type ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:14 PM
    Saturday, December 1, 2012 10:52 PM

Answers

  • It is not clear yet which course will be taken since the departure of the Windows boss. Let's wait a while.

    /* IMHO, if WinRT is pushed as replacement for Win32, <some other OS> is replacement for Windows. We need a serious stable platform, not yet another half-baked hack */

    -- pa

    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 2, 2012 4:03 PM
    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:14 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 12:40 AM
  • Haven't been to the programming world in a while. I read WinRT is some sort of replacement for Win32. Is it so? What's the difference? Should I switch to WinRT for developing desktop applications? Please share your take on this. Thanks.
    WinRT is not for developing desktop applications; it is for developing the new Windows 8 programs that run in the Modern UI (formerly called Metro).
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:14 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 4:35 PM
  • No some programs are simply not going to be ported to WinRT. Antivirus, backup etc that requires global access the WinRT sandbox won' t provide.


    Visual C++ MVP

    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:15 PM
    Tuesday, December 4, 2012 11:41 PM
  • OK, I have 2 questions regarding your comment:
     
    1. How is a new Windows 8 program that runs in the Modern UI, NOT a desktop application? What's the difference?
     
    2. If it's not a desktop application, is it meant to replace desktop application? Otherwise, why was Modern UI created in the first place, if not to replace desktop apps?
    In Windows 8, 'desktop application' normally means a program that runs on the traditional desktop.
     
    Many programs (e.g. Office) are not well suited to the Modern UI. This is why even Windows RT has a desktop mode, though only Microsoft apps (Office, Explorer, the desktop version of IE, ...) can run on it.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:15 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 5:12 PM

All replies

  • Pavel, I couldn't agree more.  There have been numerous examples of Microsoft creating new technologies that were soon deprecated afterwards, so I'm not going to go out on a limb here either.  More time is needed to decide.

    Thanks.



    • Edited by ColdBackup Sunday, December 2, 2012 7:24 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 4:03 PM
  • Haven't been to the programming world in a while. I read WinRT is some sort of replacement for Win32. Is it so? What's the difference? Should I switch to WinRT for developing desktop applications? Please share your take on this. Thanks.
    WinRT is not for developing desktop applications; it is for developing the new Windows 8 programs that run in the Modern UI (formerly called Metro).
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:14 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 4:35 PM
  • OK, I have 2 questions regarding your comment:
     
    1. How is a new Windows 8 program that runs in the Modern UI, NOT a desktop application? What's the difference?
     
    2. If it's not a desktop application, is it meant to replace desktop application? Otherwise, why was Modern UI created in the first place, if not to replace desktop apps?
    In Windows 8, 'desktop application' normally means a program that runs on the traditional desktop.
     
    Many programs (e.g. Office) are not well suited to the Modern UI. This is why even Windows RT has a desktop mode, though only Microsoft apps (Office, Explorer, the desktop version of IE, ...) can run on it.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:15 PM
    Sunday, December 2, 2012 5:12 PM
  • Even though WinRT apps are not desktop apps, who said they should be to replace desktop apps?  WinRT looks similar to .NET, particularly in gathering all languages under one roof, using purely object-oriented libraries.  It also has improvements in interaction between managed and unmanaged code, rendering P/Invoke obsolete in comparison.  It is native API unlike .NET.  All this and more, makes me wonder if WinRT is actually a runtime and programming model that would eventually replace .NET and Win32.  It is native API, something .NET lacked in performance, it is also more consistent and better structured than Win32.  In other words it takes all the benefits of both .NET and Win32, combines them and leaves .NET and Win32 behind.

    What do you think?

    Sunday, December 2, 2012 7:14 PM
  • No some programs are simply not going to be ported to WinRT. Antivirus, backup etc that requires global access the WinRT sandbox won' t provide.


    Visual C++ MVP

    • Marked as answer by ColdBackup Sunday, December 9, 2012 10:15 PM
    Tuesday, December 4, 2012 11:41 PM