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Newbie: Getting started with VisualSVN RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1242214802 posted

    Hi All: I'm finally taking the leap to source control, and have started by installing visualSVN on server 2008 R2 and installing TortoiseSVN and VisualSVN plugin for VS2010 on my development box.

    I have VisualSVN/Apache running on the server and have created a repository there.

    I have a couple of website projects that I've been working on locally and publishing to the server using web deployment. I want to place these websites under source control at the server, so that I can work on them simultaneously with another developer.

    Do I start by adding each website on the server as a project to the repository, and then create a local copy on my development box using the VisualSVN plugin using "get solution from subversion"?

    Do I need to install TortoiseSVN on the server to manage copying the websites into the repository and then putting them under source control?

    Once I'm using VisualSVN plugin, I should remove web deployment from the websites?

    If there are any best practices or gotcha's with this scenario please let me know!

    Tuesday, October 16, 2012 5:06 PM

Answers

  • User1543530712 posted

    I have a couple of website projects that I've been working on locally and publishing to the server using web deployment. I want to place these websites under source control at the server, so that I can work on them simultaneously with another developer.

    You are new to version-control and particulary to SVN as I understood. In this case I strongly advise to read SVNBook and TortoiseSVN manual. SVN can become one of the most helpful tools in your development process; reading the manuals is stongly recommended and will help you to understand the best / common practices as well as will provide you with the detailed info on the tools you have at your disposal. The devil is in the detail!

    The following introductory SVNBook topics are highly recommended for novice Apache Subversion users:

    For the VisualSVN basics check the Getting Started guide.

    Do I start by adding each website on the server as a project to the repository, and then create a local copy on my development box using the VisualSVN plugin using "get solution from subversion"?

    Do you ask about repository structure? Apache Subversion does not expect or enforce any particular layout. Check the "Planning Your Repository Organization" for the common practice overview and advice. E.g. depending on your requirements you can decide to store a project per repository or to store all of your projects in one repo.

    If you ask about how-to add your projects to Subversion repository: use "Add Solution to Subversion" wizard: Visual Studio | VisualSVN | Add Solution to Subversion to add the solution loaded in Visual Studio to a Subversion repository.

    Since you ask about website projects I additionally advise you to see the VisualSVN Knowledge Base article: "Web Development with VisualSVN".

    Do I need to install TortoiseSVN on the server to manage copying the websites into the repository and then putting them under source control?

    I don't understand this question. When you add and commit your source code to repository, it means that the code has been added and committed to source control. You don't have to install TortoiseSVN GUI client on the server in case you are OK with the command-line client. You can start svn command-line client via VisualSVN Server Manager | Action | All Tasks | Start Command Prompt.

    Once I'm using VisualSVN plugin, I should remove web deployment from the websites?

    I think this SO thread should help.

    Eh, I was probably being a bit too newbie and didn't RTFT/RTFM enough... I was able to open the project in VS2010 and add it to source control, and then commit the project so it's in the repository. In my imagination I thought there was a way to bypass publishing and instead have SVN control the publication to the live website.

    You can delpoy your website different ways with help of Subversion. E.g. you stick to the following approaches:

    • Use your own build script that will do the svn export to a web server when you commit to a "release" or "development" branches or do when you run the script manually etc etc etc,
    • Use CI tools to manage your deployment process.
    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 5:42 AM

All replies

  • User-1242214802 posted

    Eh, I was probably being a bit too newbie and didn't RTFT/RTFM enough...I was able to open the project in VS2010 and add it to source control, and then commit the project so it's in the repository.

    In my imagination I thought there was a way to bypass publishing and instead have SVN control the publication to the live website.

    Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:28 PM
  • User1543530712 posted

    I have a couple of website projects that I've been working on locally and publishing to the server using web deployment. I want to place these websites under source control at the server, so that I can work on them simultaneously with another developer.

    You are new to version-control and particulary to SVN as I understood. In this case I strongly advise to read SVNBook and TortoiseSVN manual. SVN can become one of the most helpful tools in your development process; reading the manuals is stongly recommended and will help you to understand the best / common practices as well as will provide you with the detailed info on the tools you have at your disposal. The devil is in the detail!

    The following introductory SVNBook topics are highly recommended for novice Apache Subversion users:

    For the VisualSVN basics check the Getting Started guide.

    Do I start by adding each website on the server as a project to the repository, and then create a local copy on my development box using the VisualSVN plugin using "get solution from subversion"?

    Do you ask about repository structure? Apache Subversion does not expect or enforce any particular layout. Check the "Planning Your Repository Organization" for the common practice overview and advice. E.g. depending on your requirements you can decide to store a project per repository or to store all of your projects in one repo.

    If you ask about how-to add your projects to Subversion repository: use "Add Solution to Subversion" wizard: Visual Studio | VisualSVN | Add Solution to Subversion to add the solution loaded in Visual Studio to a Subversion repository.

    Since you ask about website projects I additionally advise you to see the VisualSVN Knowledge Base article: "Web Development with VisualSVN".

    Do I need to install TortoiseSVN on the server to manage copying the websites into the repository and then putting them under source control?

    I don't understand this question. When you add and commit your source code to repository, it means that the code has been added and committed to source control. You don't have to install TortoiseSVN GUI client on the server in case you are OK with the command-line client. You can start svn command-line client via VisualSVN Server Manager | Action | All Tasks | Start Command Prompt.

    Once I'm using VisualSVN plugin, I should remove web deployment from the websites?

    I think this SO thread should help.

    Eh, I was probably being a bit too newbie and didn't RTFT/RTFM enough... I was able to open the project in VS2010 and add it to source control, and then commit the project so it's in the repository. In my imagination I thought there was a way to bypass publishing and instead have SVN control the publication to the live website.

    You can delpoy your website different ways with help of Subversion. E.g. you stick to the following approaches:

    • Use your own build script that will do the svn export to a web server when you commit to a "release" or "development" branches or do when you run the script manually etc etc etc,
    • Use CI tools to manage your deployment process.
    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 5:42 AM