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What are sinks? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Well I have an idea, but cant find a real general definition out there with out getting a massivly techincal artical. In plain english what are sinks and what are custom sinks good for? thanks!
    Wednesday, May 23, 2007 1:05 PM

Answers

  • Have you ever washed dishes?

     

    A big stack of plates are on one side of a "sink". Then you pick up the plate and wash it in the left-hand "sink", once it is clean you move it to the right-hand "sink" and rinse it, and then you move it to the right of the sink to dry in a clean stack.

     

    That is the reference to "sinks". You have an object of "something" and then you can create "sinks" or stations that perform individual tasks. These sinks get run in a sequence.

     

    So, you might have a sink for serialization (make an object a stream), another for compression (make the data as compact as possible), another for encryption (make it so it can't be understood), etc. Generally, on one side of a communication chanel the sinks go in the order of Sink A, then Sink B, then Sink C. On the other side, everything is generally reversed to put the object back in ts original state. So it would go thru Sink C, then B, then A.

     

     

    Essentially, sinks are assembly lines to prepare something for transportation and then when received the assembly line is reversed to make it whole again.

     

    Trevor

     

    Thursday, May 24, 2007 2:54 AM

All replies

  • Have you ever washed dishes?

     

    A big stack of plates are on one side of a "sink". Then you pick up the plate and wash it in the left-hand "sink", once it is clean you move it to the right-hand "sink" and rinse it, and then you move it to the right of the sink to dry in a clean stack.

     

    That is the reference to "sinks". You have an object of "something" and then you can create "sinks" or stations that perform individual tasks. These sinks get run in a sequence.

     

    So, you might have a sink for serialization (make an object a stream), another for compression (make the data as compact as possible), another for encryption (make it so it can't be understood), etc. Generally, on one side of a communication chanel the sinks go in the order of Sink A, then Sink B, then Sink C. On the other side, everything is generally reversed to put the object back in ts original state. So it would go thru Sink C, then B, then A.

     

     

    Essentially, sinks are assembly lines to prepare something for transportation and then when received the assembly line is reversed to make it whole again.

     

    Trevor

     

    Thursday, May 24, 2007 2:54 AM
  • Hi BlueBSH, to add to Trevor's answer, check out the MSDN page on channel sinks or the full details:

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/tdzwhfy3(VS.71).aspx

     

    Cheers,

    JJustice [MSFT]

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 4:50 AM
    Moderator