none
Disproportionate labelling size due to village/town naming coincidences RRS feed

  • Question

  • A bit of a curious one this....

    One of my colleagues just noticed that our application, which details water/sewerage related information in the South West of England and uses the Bing AJAX v6.3 control, is displaying the names of small villages in Devon and Cornwall (e.g. Sheffield, Luton, Bradford, Blackpool) with disproportionately large/bold labels. These villages share their name with large conurbations elsewhere in England, and so the cause of the sizing issue is relatively clear. However, I have not noticed this before, and so I assume that a recent change must have caused it i.e. some new rules 'round the back' that link place names to place sizes/populations when the tiles are generated.

    I've had a look at the same area (you can see this for yourself if you look for Penzance/Newlyn in the extreme SW of Cornwall) in both the AJAX 6.3 Interactive SDK, and in the main v7 hub at http://www.bing.com/maps. The Interactive SDK shows exactly the same issue, but the v7 map does not. Notably, the v7 hub uses a different set of road/aerial tiles, so that explains why it looks ok. But the problem remains for 6.3.

    I guess this is more of a bug/glitch report than a request for help, but if anyone has any ideas about when/why/how this may have transpired, replies would be most welcome!

    Monday, August 6, 2012 2:37 PM

Answers

  • This is a known issue that was already brought up on this forum. The issue appears to be that Sheffield road in this area of the map is miss categorized as a city. The data team is aware of this and will fix this in the next data update release.

    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by todd_bulky Monday, August 13, 2012 9:02 AM
    Saturday, August 11, 2012 2:29 PM

All replies

  • Fascinating... I agree that this is definitely a mistake, and it's interesting that nobody's ever spotted it before!

    It's hard to assess the scope of the affected entities - only certain placenames seem to be miscategorised, and only at certain zoom levels. I looked for more examples close to me but couldn't find any (Boston in Lincolnshire, for example, is rendered with the correct weight - not the same as Boston, Massachussetts!).

    I couldn't find your examples of Sheffield or Luton, but the example below shows Bradford, Devon at zoom level 10, which is rendered with far too much emphasis in both v7.0 and v6.3 SDKs (both use the same tile at http://ecn.t3.tiles.virtualearth.net/tiles/r0313130233.png?g=1008&mkt=en-us):

    What's interesting is that http://www.bing.com/maps requests a slightly different tile (http://ecn.dynamic.t3.tiles.virtualearth.net/comp/CompositionHandler/0313130233?mkt=en-gb&it=G,VE,BX,L,LA&shading=hill&n=z) on which this error is corrected:

    Hopefully this means that the tiles based on the corrected labelling algorithm will be rolled out to the AJAX controls relatively soon.


    twitter: @alastaira blog: http://alastaira.wordpress.com/

    Tuesday, August 7, 2012 7:28 AM
    Moderator
  • Here's Sheffield...near Penzance!

    Bing maps with disproportionately sized labels

    Tuesday, August 7, 2012 9:11 AM
  • ...and the small village of Luton, labelled the same size and weight as the city of Exeter...

    The small village of Luton labelled the same size and weight as the city of Exeter

    Tuesday, August 7, 2012 9:16 AM
  • Oh wow - I can see that enormous "Sheffield" now. That's actually pretty funny (once you get over the horrendous data quality issue) :)

    twitter: @alastaira blog: http://alastaira.wordpress.com/

    Tuesday, August 7, 2012 1:39 PM
    Moderator
  • This is a known issue that was already brought up on this forum. The issue appears to be that Sheffield road in this area of the map is miss categorized as a city. The data team is aware of this and will fix this in the next data update release.

    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    • Marked as answer by todd_bulky Monday, August 13, 2012 9:02 AM
    Saturday, August 11, 2012 2:29 PM