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MSDN License Keys provided, but watermark still present RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a volume MSDN license that gives me product keys to both the Windows Embedded Standard 7 Tool Kit, and the Windows Embedded Standard 7 runtime. As well as just a windows embedded standard key. I entered the key into the tool kit, and it no longer gives me the 180 day warning. I placed the runtime key into two separate places in my answer file.

    After I install from my answer file, the warning on the control panel about windows not being genuine have gone away, but the windows eval water mark is still present even though I have selected to hide it.

    Does the MSDN license not provide the full blown WES7? Any suggestions?


    • Edited by BunRockter Thursday, June 14, 2012 7:30 AM spelling error
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 7:29 AM

Answers

  • No. you have to sign the license agreement to get access to the ECE. When your customer get the run time key, have them give it to you so it can be included in the build. Only one run time key is needed for Windows Embedded. A license sticker gets placed on each unit shipped.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - Pro Guide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, Pro Guide to POS for .NET

    • Marked as answer by BunRockter Thursday, June 21, 2012 11:54 PM
    Tuesday, June 19, 2012 11:05 PM
  • Since I had recently gone through this, I can add a bit of information.  My disclaimer is that your company's legal department should review the license agreement once set up to reconfirm details of what I'll state generally.  However, I'll relay my experience:

    Your MSDN account will provide access to the full production tools provided you have an account that covers Embedded (or for others reading this that doesn't have MSDN, they can be purchased individually).  As you discovered the key provided is only the 180 day eval key.  Once you have the agreement in place with Microsoft, you can request the full license key without actually buying any licenses.  You are free to develop with the production tools and test internally with your company and use this license key.  I recommend doing so as soon as poosible to avoid frustrations when the RTC on one of your targets inevitably gets messed up falsely triggering the expiration.  There may be limits to the total number of devices - this should be stated in your agreement. 

    Only once you begin to sell the devices or test outside your company will you need to pay for individual licenses.

    Larry

    • Marked as answer by BunRockter Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:53 PM
    Monday, June 25, 2012 2:57 PM

All replies

  • I just checked the system area of the control panel, and it shows that I have 180 days left of evaluation. It also shows a product ID that is all numbers, and when I click to add a key, I get an error message box that says that Slui.exe could not be found. I don't see the key I provided in the answer file anywhere? I have double checked the key and it appears to be entered correctly into the answer file. Any suggestions?

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 7:36 AM
  • you placed it in 2 seperate places? you mean stages?  which one?
    just add the key in stage 1 WinPE and you will be fine.


    Windows Embedded Developer and Scripting Guy //Germany (Preparing a blog about Windows Embedded Standard)

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 1:06 PM
  • The run time key that you have entered is the 180 day trial. Typically, the 180 day key is provided on the MSDN website. Your company needs to sign a license agreement with Microsoft before you can get the real run time key. A Microsoft distributor can provide more information. Has your company signed a license agreement?

    Also you need to be aware of the different licensing levels.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsembedded/en-us/develop/windows-embedded-standard-7-os-components.aspx

    You need the specific key for the specific level.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - Pro Guide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, Pro Guide to POS for .NET


    • Edited by Sean LimingMVP Friday, June 15, 2012 1:21 AM
    • Proposed as answer by KNARZ Friday, June 15, 2012 1:23 AM
    Friday, June 15, 2012 1:20 AM
  • Argh i totaly forget this MSDN stuff with no real key. Sean is right.

    Windows Embedded Developer and Scripting Guy //Germany (Preparing a blog about Windows Embedded Standard)

    Friday, June 15, 2012 1:24 AM
  • @Sean,

    The MSDN guy led me to beleive that this was a better option than purchasing the actual runtime licenses. I am only doing the desing & initial set up. The licenses will be paid for later by the customer durring manufacturing. Am I missing anything with the 180 day trial?

    As far as the componants go We are planing to use the P SKU.

    I have also noticed that there are several patches that I need to apply. I can't use the WEDU, can I get access to ECE with an MSDN subscription, without actually being the end user/manufacturer of the product? I don't know how ECE works.

    Friday, June 15, 2012 3:44 AM
  • Whoever this MSDN guy is, they were wrong and clearly don't know anything about embedded. You can do the development and testing, but at some point the key needs to be put into the build. To get access to ECE, you have to sign the license agreement first. Again, a Microsoft distributor can assist you. Where are you located?

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - Pro Guide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, Pro Guide to POS for .NET

    Friday, June 15, 2012 6:39 AM
  • I won't be purchasing the licenses, the person I am designing the hardware for will when it goes to manufacturing. Can I still get access to ECE if I am not going to buy a license?
    Friday, June 15, 2012 11:02 PM
  • ECE website provide the OEM vendor information. If your wan to apply the webite please contact local Microsoft distribute to sign CLA (customert license agreement).   And your will get the CLA number , use the CLA number you can to apply account on ECE.


    Johnny

    Tuesday, June 19, 2012 7:52 AM
  • No. you have to sign the license agreement to get access to the ECE. When your customer get the run time key, have them give it to you so it can be included in the build. Only one run time key is needed for Windows Embedded. A license sticker gets placed on each unit shipped.

    -Sean


    www.sjjmicro.com / www.seanliming.com / www.annabooks.com, Book Author - Pro Guide to WES 7, XP Embedded Advanced, Pro Guide to POS for .NET

    • Marked as answer by BunRockter Thursday, June 21, 2012 11:54 PM
    Tuesday, June 19, 2012 11:05 PM
  • Since I had recently gone through this, I can add a bit of information.  My disclaimer is that your company's legal department should review the license agreement once set up to reconfirm details of what I'll state generally.  However, I'll relay my experience:

    Your MSDN account will provide access to the full production tools provided you have an account that covers Embedded (or for others reading this that doesn't have MSDN, they can be purchased individually).  As you discovered the key provided is only the 180 day eval key.  Once you have the agreement in place with Microsoft, you can request the full license key without actually buying any licenses.  You are free to develop with the production tools and test internally with your company and use this license key.  I recommend doing so as soon as poosible to avoid frustrations when the RTC on one of your targets inevitably gets messed up falsely triggering the expiration.  There may be limits to the total number of devices - this should be stated in your agreement. 

    Only once you begin to sell the devices or test outside your company will you need to pay for individual licenses.

    Larry

    • Marked as answer by BunRockter Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:53 PM
    Monday, June 25, 2012 2:57 PM