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Testing in multiple versions of Office RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi there,

    I am developing an Add-In software to Powerpoint, and need to make sure it works on PPT 07, 10 (x86), 10 (x64), 13 (x86) and 13 (x64), and hence would love separate testing environments to make this work.

    Is there any easy solution to having five environments. Can you use Windows Azure to load five Windows Desktop environments and restore them to fresh for each new test?


    Thursday, February 6, 2014 6:17 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    >> Can you use Windows Azure to load five Windows Desktop environments and restore them to fresh for each new test? <<

    Yes. We could create 5 Azure virtual machines and install one version of Office in each virtual machine to test your PowerPoint add-in.

    In fact, we could not install all these 5 versions of office in a machine. 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Office programs don’t get along with each other. Having two versions of Office on the same PC can sometimes create other problems.

    In addition, what’s the targeted Office version of your PowerPoint Add-in project? What’s the target .NET Framework version of your project?

    Solutions that were created by using Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2013 or Visual Studio 2010 can run in Office 2013, Office 2010, or the 2007 Microsoft Office system. But the solution can use only those features and APIs that are available in all three versions of Office since the latest versions will have some new features. You could refer to the figure below to see which versions of Office can run your Add-in solution.

    More details please refer to Running Solutions in Different Versions of Microsoft Office.


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    Friday, February 7, 2014 8:57 AM
  • Hello Zezan,

    There is no need to use Windows Azure. For example, I used separate virtual machines with different Office versions installed for testing add-ins and polish their UI and responsiveness.

    Note, the VSTO runtime is responsible for loading your add-in. It doesn't matter whether the host application is a x64 or x86 application if you set the target platform to the AnyCPU value. So, if VSTO runtime supports the required versions, your add-in should be loaded successfully. You just need to use APIs corresponding the host application version. For example, some properties and methods may be missing in earlier versions of the host application. Thus, you need to sure that your code won't invoke any method which is absent in the current version of PowerPoint.

    For example, you may reference the oldest PIAs in the project and include them into the setup program. Thus you can be sure that you don't call any forbidden methods or properties. But if the add-in is loaded by the newest PowerPoint version, you can use the Reflection technique for accessing the new APIs available only to the current PowerPoint version. See the Type.InvokeMember method for details.

    Friday, February 7, 2014 6:48 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    >> Can you use Windows Azure to load five Windows Desktop environments and restore them to fresh for each new test? <<

    Yes. We could create 5 Azure virtual machines and install one version of Office in each virtual machine to test your PowerPoint add-in.

    In fact, we could not install all these 5 versions of office in a machine. 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Office programs don’t get along with each other. Having two versions of Office on the same PC can sometimes create other problems.

    In addition, what’s the targeted Office version of your PowerPoint Add-in project? What’s the target .NET Framework version of your project?

    Solutions that were created by using Visual Studio 2013, Visual Studio 2013 or Visual Studio 2010 can run in Office 2013, Office 2010, or the 2007 Microsoft Office system. But the solution can use only those features and APIs that are available in all three versions of Office since the latest versions will have some new features. You could refer to the figure below to see which versions of Office can run your Add-in solution.

    More details please refer to Running Solutions in Different Versions of Microsoft Office.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Friday, February 7, 2014 8:57 AM
  • Hello Zezan,

    There is no need to use Windows Azure. For example, I used separate virtual machines with different Office versions installed for testing add-ins and polish their UI and responsiveness.

    Note, the VSTO runtime is responsible for loading your add-in. It doesn't matter whether the host application is a x64 or x86 application if you set the target platform to the AnyCPU value. So, if VSTO runtime supports the required versions, your add-in should be loaded successfully. You just need to use APIs corresponding the host application version. For example, some properties and methods may be missing in earlier versions of the host application. Thus, you need to sure that your code won't invoke any method which is absent in the current version of PowerPoint.

    For example, you may reference the oldest PIAs in the project and include them into the setup program. Thus you can be sure that you don't call any forbidden methods or properties. But if the add-in is loaded by the newest PowerPoint version, you can use the Reflection technique for accessing the new APIs available only to the current PowerPoint version. See the Type.InvokeMember method for details.

    Friday, February 7, 2014 6:48 PM