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Codecs support got worse?

    General discussion

  • One of the things I liked most about Windows 7 was improved codecs support. I expected Microsoft to continue to go this route with Windows 8 and add more codecs and blu-ray support. But it turns out Windows 8 Developer Preview includes even less codecs than Windows 7! It no longer supports MPEG-2 video codec, AC-3 (Dolby Digital) audio codec and cannot playback DVD. It's a big disappointment after Windows 7, so I hope this features will be added to the final version. Also I'd like to see native support for blu-ray, mkv, DTS audio and VC-1 video in ts/m2ts.
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 4:51 AM

All replies

  • The Windows 8 Developer Preview does not include all the features of a final release. Just because the Developer Preview is missing or doesn't support something doesn't mean the RTM version will be the same.

     

    NOTE: The preview build does not include every feature shown this morning.  Shown but not in the Developer Preview release include the Windows Store, Windows Live Metro style apps, and some of the user interface features.  The focus of the preview is the API and development tools for building Metro style apps.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/09/13/welcome-to-windows-8-the-developer-preview.aspx

     

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:28 AM
  • The Windows 8 Developer Preview does not include all the features of a final release. Just because the Developer Preview is missing or doesn't support something doesn't mean the RTM version will be the same.

    NOTE: The preview build does not include every feature shown this morning.  Shown but not in the Developer Preview release include the Windows Store, Windows Live Metro style apps, and some of the user interface features.  The focus of the preview is the API and development tools for building Metro style apps.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/09/13/welcome-to-windows-8-the-developer-preview.aspx


    Thanks, I read that, but it's not guaranteed that it will be included in RTM either, right? So I figured it's worth posting.
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:27 AM
  • For the majority of codecs,  it is up to codecs developer to add support for Windows 8 and eventually license the codecs to Microsoft or to Windows users if downloaded separately. 



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    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:14 PM
  • For the majority of codecs,  it is up to codecs developer to add support for Windows 8 and eventually license the codecs to Microsoft or to Windows users if downloaded separately. 


    Yeah, it was like that in Windows XP times and it was a nightmare. You had to install codecpack or a bunch of separate codecs. Many of them were buggy, they crashed WMP and Explorer, conflicted with each other, had various playback problems. But Windows 7 changed this situation, since it supported almost all common codecs (with a few exceptions) out of the box.

    "In Windows 7 we let you enjoy the media you want and don’t trouble you with the need to know about file types or codecs in most cases. (For more details, see Table 1 below)."
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2009/05/12/media-streaming-with-windows-7.aspx

    "Customers loved the increased range of formats natively supported by the Windows 7 Beta, but noticed areas where they wanted broader support.  For example, one was unable to seek to a specific spot in the video in Windows Media Player or Windows Media Center for AVCHD content that was imported from a digital camcorder. We’ve addressed this."
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2009/02/26/some-changes-since-beta.aspx

    I just wish Windows 8 to be at least not worse than Windows 7 regarding media formats support.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 3:41 AM