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SQL Server Schema - Where does the Schema and the scope of a Membership Provider end? RRS feed

  • Question

  • My Account Schema

    I'm working on a system which is going to match people to careers.  It's similar to a Monster or other job finding website.  A user can create an account, identify which certifications, work history or education they have, submit resumes to specific jobs or job categories, etc.

    Everything in the above board I consider to be part of my 'Account' Schema.  My thinking is that a user has ownership of all the sub-tables and Resumes, as well as their individual permissions.  As such, that's all rolled into an account.

    The Account.User will be accessed in one of three ways: 1) Resume is submitted to a specific job, 2) Resume is submitted to a specific job category, or 3) An administrator can search the Accounts to see which users have certain criteria, ie. a specific certification or X years of experience in a specific field.

    What I need to know is...

    1) Is this the right way to design a schema?  In my database I figured I'd use Schemas to, if anything, to help alleviate ambiguity and to create larger classes within my Entity model when it's generated... but, is this the right purpose?  Is it too large?  Too small?  Not broken up enough?  So clueless on this front...

    2) When I write my membership provider, how far does it extend... to the full scope of the schema, or just to a few tables like User, Groups and Roles?  

    3) Just looking at the diagram, is there any advice or suggestion you can offer for better design or utilization?

    I look forward to all your comments and suggestions.  Thanks in advance for your time.

    Wednesday, August 8, 2012 5:04 PM

Answers

  • 1) I would use schema if group of users accces specific tables within a database.For example Finance people access 'their' tables but might have access others too.Advantages are a) Easy manage b) Single database, no need to maintain a few databases.

     Is it too large? Too small?  No, it is absolutely correct way to design databases.

    3) Wow, it is hard to read it :-))))))


    Best Regards,Uri Dimant SQL Server MVP,http://sqlblog.com/blogs/uri_dimant/

    • Proposed as answer by Kent Waldrop Wednesday, August 8, 2012 9:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by Maggie Luo Thursday, August 16, 2012 4:24 PM
    Wednesday, August 8, 2012 5:37 PM

All replies

  • 1) I would use schema if group of users accces specific tables within a database.For example Finance people access 'their' tables but might have access others too.Advantages are a) Easy manage b) Single database, no need to maintain a few databases.

     Is it too large? Too small?  No, it is absolutely correct way to design databases.

    3) Wow, it is hard to read it :-))))))


    Best Regards,Uri Dimant SQL Server MVP,http://sqlblog.com/blogs/uri_dimant/

    • Proposed as answer by Kent Waldrop Wednesday, August 8, 2012 9:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by Maggie Luo Thursday, August 16, 2012 4:24 PM
    Wednesday, August 8, 2012 5:37 PM
  • very helpful..

    Thanks

    Monday, August 20, 2012 1:40 PM