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How to install VB6 and VS2010 for (not on) the same PC RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a year old Inspiron N1170 with a CORE i5 chip running Windows 7 Home Premium.  I have Office 2010 Professional installed and want to learn VB/VBA programming, starting with Excel Macros.  I would like to know if Excel 2010 uses VB6 or VB2010 in Excel's VB Editor AND I would like to know how to install two versions of VB for this laptop.  I have a 10GB external harddrive I can dedicate if necessary to the VB6 package.  I do not want to have to repartition the internal harddrive in the laptop and I do not want to have to delete the existing Office apps in order to install a previous Office version first and then reinstall the 2010 package.

    Please feel free to reply directly to jwdickinson@att.net with your reply.

     

    J. W. Dickinson

    Monday, August 27, 2012 1:32 PM

Answers

  • Hi Dickinson

    I'm not certain Joe has correctly understood your question...

    Office 2010 bases on VB(A) 7, believe it or not. It will be installed with Office, no need for you to install anything in addition in order to work with Excel macros.

    If you decide you want to create independent applications, outside of Excel, in order to manipulate Office, then you require a version of Visual Studio .NET (2010 or 2012 is probably what you can get at this moment). If you simply want to learn, without spending any additional money, then I recommend you download VB.NET 2010 (or 2012) EXPRESS.

    Should you then decide you want to do more professional work, you can buy a full version of Visual Studio .NET. By then, you may also be able to judge which release you require (i.e. how much you need to pay). If it turns out you need to work with VSTO, that would be Visual Studio Professional.


    Cindy Meister, VSTO/Word MVP

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 6:36 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • It's VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) that 'native' Office macros are written in.

    VB6 is not officially supported by Microsoft anymore. I'm not sure what you mean by 'VB2010'. VB.NET is what Microsoft would recommend for writing external applications. External applications can control (automate) Excel.

    Monday, August 27, 2012 6:27 PM
  • Thanks Joseph.  Saves me a bunch of money and headache.

    J. W. Dickinson

    Monday, August 27, 2012 7:20 PM
  • Hi Dickinson

    I'm not certain Joe has correctly understood your question...

    Office 2010 bases on VB(A) 7, believe it or not. It will be installed with Office, no need for you to install anything in addition in order to work with Excel macros.

    If you decide you want to create independent applications, outside of Excel, in order to manipulate Office, then you require a version of Visual Studio .NET (2010 or 2012 is probably what you can get at this moment). If you simply want to learn, without spending any additional money, then I recommend you download VB.NET 2010 (or 2012) EXPRESS.

    Should you then decide you want to do more professional work, you can buy a full version of Visual Studio .NET. By then, you may also be able to judge which release you require (i.e. how much you need to pay). If it turns out you need to work with VSTO, that would be Visual Studio Professional.


    Cindy Meister, VSTO/Word MVP

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 6:36 AM
    Moderator
  • "I would like to know if Excel 2010 uses VB6 or VB2010 in Excel's VB Editor AND I would like to know how to install two versions of VB for this laptop." 

    I think the question's pretty clear. Since JWDickinson mentioned Excel's VB editor, he/she presumably knows that that default capability is built in.

    Cindy makes a good point about Visual Studio Express. For programming standalone applications, I would also recommend that as the most hassle-free way to get started.

    However, I would like to emphasize that you only 'require' Visual Studio (or .NET) for programming in Visual Basic. Visual Basic is Microsoft Specific. But there are a bunch of other versions of the Basic language, several of which are have built in COM capabilities, and these can be used to manipulate Office in the same way as Visual Basic .NET (e.g. PowerBasic, BBC BASIC).

    • Edited by JosephFox Tuesday, August 28, 2012 2:32 PM
    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 2:29 PM
  • Hi Cindy,

    Wow, between your answer and Joseph's I am much more relieved that I don't have to make an expensive purchase to pursue the Excel VB macro programming.  I'm not entirely certain right now as to why I would need to start programming in VS...but there may come a day that I decide to follow that path.

    Thank you to both of you for your kind and timely replies.


    J. W. Dickinson

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:07 PM
  • Just to confirm; you don't need Visual Studio for programming macros.

    You would need Visual Studio, or an alternative compiler, for programming standalone applications. These are the the things you double click on your deskop. Also, you would need Visual Studio (or alternative compiler) for programming an Office AddIn...I don't want to confuse you too much by dumping more information...but for some things, such as adding a custom tab on the Office Ribbon, you need an AddIn rather than macros.

    Have fun, and post back if you get stuck trying to write a macro. There are some great macro writers on these forums (e.g. Cindy, as you might guess from the points by her name).

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:23 PM
  • Got it!  Thank you!  I AM looking forward to making my Excel files more useful and functional.

    BTW...long ago when I first became interested in Excel VBA macros...and got sidetracked by work and life, I purchased a book that was nothing more than a complete compendium of VB items...I think it was titled The Visual Basic 6 Bible.  Do you or anyone know if such a text exists for VS2010?

    Thanks!


    J. W. Dickinson

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:35 PM
  • Hi J.W.

    When you get stuck on Excel-things while working on your macros, your best place to ask would be the Excel for Developers forum, where you'll find Excel specialists. This forum is more for general Office things and for Office applications that have no forum of their own (PowerPoint, Visio, Project, Publisher, etc.) To find it, all you need to do is scroll to the top of this discussion window and click on the "Microsoft Office Developer forums" breadcrumb at top of the page.

    With all the free information available on the Internet these days, publishers are getting very wary about printing books - fewer people are buying them. In comparison to VB6, Visual Studio .NET is huge, exponentially - it would require volumes, a veritable encyclopaedia, to cover everything. And nothing in it would relate to Office :-)

    If you want something to help you migrate from VBA / classical VB to VB.NET, I recommend dropping by a VB.NET forum and asking the question there. I got my feet wet in .NET by way of C# and found the "Step-By-Step" book for that language very useful. I later looked at the Step-by-Step for VB.NET and was very disappointed as it tended to ignore the .NET things and concentrated on the classical VB inside of .NET. Admittedly, this perhaps makes it simpler in the short run to move into the environment, but you miss out on so much of the capability offered by the new methods... So it's difficult to make a recommendation - much better to post where you can get a good discussion going!


    Cindy Meister, VSTO/Word MVP

    Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:54 AM
    Moderator