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Metro apps that have their functionality extended by desktop apps?

    Question

  • While metro is great, it has it's limitations (and for a good reason).

    I'm thinking about developing applications that consist of 2 parts - one metro style app that can run by itself perfectly but with only partial functionality. And another - desktop portion that would expand capabilities of metro apps.

    Here's an example. Suppose I write a log file analyser that works with logs in folders outside of user's documents. So metro app can get to these only via file picker. While this is nice and works in the end of the day it is cumbersome. I can have a desktop component of the app that the user can later install by downloading it from my website though the link within the app UI. This desktop app, having local system access and running as a service can feed log files to my metro app via http or some other means.

    Would doing something like this jeopardize chances of getting though the app store review of the metro app?

    Thursday, September 22, 2011 4:10 AM

Answers

  • Basically we are talking about two applications here. One is the actual logfile generator (.net based) while the other is the Metro app that takes a HTML stream and displays that.

    The first one isn't eligable for review so there's no problem there. The second one is going to be reviewed but since all it does is connect to a (local) web server and display that data, there shouldn't be a reason to reject it.

    Of course, in your situation you need both apps to have a working environment so only installing the second app is going to be pretty useless. But useless apps have been allowed to go into the WP7 marketplace since that opened up so I don't see a reason here why it shouldn't work like that :-)

     


    Dennis Vroegop Destrato Microsoft MVP Surface
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 12:00 PM

All replies

  • Basically we are talking about two applications here. One is the actual logfile generator (.net based) while the other is the Metro app that takes a HTML stream and displays that.

    The first one isn't eligable for review so there's no problem there. The second one is going to be reviewed but since all it does is connect to a (local) web server and display that data, there shouldn't be a reason to reject it.

    Of course, in your situation you need both apps to have a working environment so only installing the second app is going to be pretty useless. But useless apps have been allowed to go into the WP7 marketplace since that opened up so I don't see a reason here why it shouldn't work like that :-)

     


    Dennis Vroegop Destrato Microsoft MVP Surface
    Thursday, September 22, 2011 12:00 PM
  • It seems that Metro apps are (at least for now) prohibited from connecting to the local machine unless the service is hosted in the Metro app itself:

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winappswithcsharp/thread/17a542e1-8035-4139-9395-d73e3b222eb6

    I guess you won't be able to connect to your desktop application local service. It seems that services for Metro apps will have to be hosted on a remote server or the cloud.

    Friday, September 23, 2011 8:45 PM