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Issues with Microsoft Add-in removing Java RRS feed

  • Question

  • I recently wrote an add-in for Microsoft Office Outlook and deployed it to a few members as a beta. We noticed that when you installed the add-in it removed Java from the machine. Please help I need both to be able to work at the same time.
    Monday, July 7, 2014 7:00 PM

Answers

  • Hi Michael,

    As Eugene mentioned, you need to make a test for this case to confirm what causes this issue.

    But I don't think a Outlook Add-in will affect JAVA. Every Office Add-in would has it's own application domain.

    Historically, process boundaries have been used to isolate applications running on the same computer. Each application is loaded into a separate process, which isolates the application from other applications running on the same computer.

    The applications are isolated because memory addresses are process-relative; a memory pointer passed from one process to another cannot be used in any meaningful way in the target process. In addition, you cannot make direct calls between two processes. Instead, you must use proxies, which provide a level of indirection.

    For more information, please refer to Application Domains.

    Hope this helps.


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    Thursday, July 10, 2014 3:18 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hello Michael,

    Why did you decide that your add-in is the cause of the issue?

    You may treat your add-in as a regular .Net based application. It doesn't do or doesn't require anything specific to Java.

    Monday, July 7, 2014 7:14 PM
  • Well all the machines had Java installed on them and we could access a Printer's configuration page. The machines that we installed the add-in on could no longer view the configuration page and after reinstalling Java on the machine. I get the error:

    application Blocked by Security Settings

    Name: linkTabs

    Location: Http://**.**.**.**

    your security settings have blocked an untrusted application from running

    All of the machines were configured the same and could run beforehand.

    Monday, July 7, 2014 7:29 PM
  • Where and when do you get such an error?

    Do you have any antivirus software (firewall?) installed on the PC?

    BTW It looks like the issue depend on the security settings. Did you have a chance to take a look at the Trust center settings in Office?

    Monday, July 7, 2014 7:55 PM
  • I get it whenever I try to load the web display for one of our printers. I have not been able to find the location to access the Trust Center. It is in internet explorer and chrome that give me issues.
    Monday, July 7, 2014 8:08 PM
  • How is it related to Office if you get the error in the browser?

    Are you able to reproduce the issue with a newly created empty add-in project?

    I don't believe that a .Net based add-in can change something in that way. Most probably you installed some dependencies that may affect PCs. Is this the case?

    Monday, July 7, 2014 8:16 PM
  • No because the only thing in the installer was the microsoft Outlook Add-in. That was my thought before on the issue but it is only the computers that have it installed on them that get this issue.
    Monday, July 7, 2014 8:22 PM
  • Are you able to reproduce the issue with a newly created empty add-in project?

    If so, I'd recommend to deploy an empty windows forms application and see what happens. I don't believe that a .Net based add-in can change something in that way.

    Tuesday, July 8, 2014 7:42 AM
  • I can't get Java to go back to test it.
    Wednesday, July 9, 2014 1:08 PM
  • Hi Michael,

    As Eugene mentioned, you need to make a test for this case to confirm what causes this issue.

    But I don't think a Outlook Add-in will affect JAVA. Every Office Add-in would has it's own application domain.

    Historically, process boundaries have been used to isolate applications running on the same computer. Each application is loaded into a separate process, which isolates the application from other applications running on the same computer.

    The applications are isolated because memory addresses are process-relative; a memory pointer passed from one process to another cannot be used in any meaningful way in the target process. In addition, you cannot make direct calls between two processes. Instead, you must use proxies, which provide a level of indirection.

    For more information, please refer to Application Domains.

    Hope this helps.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Thursday, July 10, 2014 3:18 AM
    Moderator