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Classic Desktop is just another Metro app?

    Question

  • I have some questions related to the comment made in Sinofsky' blog that a classic desktop is just another app: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/08/31/designing-for-metro-style-and-the-desktop.aspx

     

    For a user restarting the computer into Metro mode (and one who never opens the classic destkop): Does it mean that desktop applications that would normally run through the 'Run' or 'RunOnce' key will not run until the user switches to the classic desktop for the first time? If this is true, what is the behavior if a Win32 service silently launches a Win32 program in a logged in user' context. Will this automatically initialize the classic desktop behind the scenes thus triggering the execution of 'Run' and 'RunOnce' keys even though user never switched to the classic desktop manually?

    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 2:31 AM

Answers

  • The desktop in Windows 8 is definitely not an app. While it is true that some of the functionality has changed with the redesigned Windows Explorer, windows such as Task Manager can appear overtop of the Start Screen and Metro-style apps. When Windows Explorer, which now includes the Charms, the Start Screen, and left-side app switching, is closed, desktop apps can still be used. If you look through a list of running processes, you will find that the desktop is not an app that can be closed. In fact, it could be argued that Metro and the entire Metro UI is an app, while the desktop is not.
    Wednesday, November 02, 2011 2:10 AM

All replies

  • That's not to answer your question but rather to ask a counter-question: isn't a Metro desktop is just another desktop (pretty much like the Logon screen and UAC screen which are additional desktops)?
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Wednesday, October 19, 2011 6:59 AM
  • The desktop in Windows 8 is definitely not an app. While it is true that some of the functionality has changed with the redesigned Windows Explorer, windows such as Task Manager can appear overtop of the Start Screen and Metro-style apps. When Windows Explorer, which now includes the Charms, the Start Screen, and left-side app switching, is closed, desktop apps can still be used. If you look through a list of running processes, you will find that the desktop is not an app that can be closed. In fact, it could be argued that Metro and the entire Metro UI is an app, while the desktop is not.
    Wednesday, November 02, 2011 2:10 AM