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User Rights for .NET Developer Machine RRS feed

  • Question

  • I Have been using machines that had Local Admin Rights, for Development of Projects(including .NET) in  my 11 years of career.

    I develop WEB,Windows,Windows Service Projects.
    But the new client where i am, is not a.NET SHOP and they are not convinced that Admin Rights(OR even the tasks mentioned below are necessary to develop .net applications) are needed to develop .NET Applications.

    I will appreciate response from MS or other Senior developers & managers along with company names where developers have local Admin Rights or Rights to do the Following list of activities.(I have already gathered responses from where i have worked in my past project)

    1) Access to .NET Framework Configuration Tools
    2) Access to ODBC configuration tool
    3) Access to Create virtual directories and set their properties
    4) Access to Run Setups (Install/Uninstall), which are created using Visual Studio
    5) Access to Create/View Performance Monitors
    6) If and when creating Windows Service, access to install/Uninstall/Start/Stop Service and access to service manger
    7) Access to GAC Tools

    I am being asked to develop applications, where i don't even have permission to store files other then on only one folder in a given drive.

    Also what other type of users other then admin, can be used to perform the above mentioned tasks ?

    Friday, February 20, 2009 3:44 PM

Answers

  • There's always a healthy ammount of trust issues between system admins and developers, admins want to keep their workstations managable, while a developers life is usually alot easier if he has local admin rights.  Starting a job at a new employer or client by making a big fuzz about not having admin rights might not be the best start. There's usually a couple of roads you can walk.

    1) System admins will never give you admin rights unless a manager above you sends a work order for them to do so, if you have a manger use him that what they are for.  If you are unable to do your job tell your him, resolve the issue but don't walk in with a list of things you might do in the future and therefore need admin rights now since that (as you have noticed) rarely goes over well, because i always had admin rights is also not good enough of a reason.

    2) If you walked that route and came out empty handed, just start working as non admin you'll be surprised on how much you can actually do without having local admin rights.  If you do bump into issues where you really *NEED* to do something, open up a support ticket for each issue. There's a big change that rights for those specific things can be given though group policies. Its alot easier to battle a small thing you need right now and have a good reason at this moment then to come up with a list of reasons for tasks you might do in the future that require it.

    3) Like any new relationship you need to build trust with the people around you, walking in the first day going hey I need admin rights the answer you'll get from 99.9% of the sysadmins will be, "no you don't, and uhh who are you?!" once people get you know you and what you do the better the chances of being trusted with local admin privileges.

    Whatever you do play by the rules, its their playground their rules

    • Marked as answer by Zhi-Xin Ye Thursday, February 26, 2009 9:21 AM
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 2:08 AM

All replies

  • There's always a healthy ammount of trust issues between system admins and developers, admins want to keep their workstations managable, while a developers life is usually alot easier if he has local admin rights.  Starting a job at a new employer or client by making a big fuzz about not having admin rights might not be the best start. There's usually a couple of roads you can walk.

    1) System admins will never give you admin rights unless a manager above you sends a work order for them to do so, if you have a manger use him that what they are for.  If you are unable to do your job tell your him, resolve the issue but don't walk in with a list of things you might do in the future and therefore need admin rights now since that (as you have noticed) rarely goes over well, because i always had admin rights is also not good enough of a reason.

    2) If you walked that route and came out empty handed, just start working as non admin you'll be surprised on how much you can actually do without having local admin rights.  If you do bump into issues where you really *NEED* to do something, open up a support ticket for each issue. There's a big change that rights for those specific things can be given though group policies. Its alot easier to battle a small thing you need right now and have a good reason at this moment then to come up with a list of reasons for tasks you might do in the future that require it.

    3) Like any new relationship you need to build trust with the people around you, walking in the first day going hey I need admin rights the answer you'll get from 99.9% of the sysadmins will be, "no you don't, and uhh who are you?!" once people get you know you and what you do the better the chances of being trusted with local admin privileges.

    Whatever you do play by the rules, its their playground their rules

    • Marked as answer by Zhi-Xin Ye Thursday, February 26, 2009 9:21 AM
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 2:08 AM
  • Ray

     your suggestions sounds really practical way of doing it.

    what i am surprised to find is that i have worked in bigger places and never had to ask for specific rights, companies, like pfizer, circuitcity, ny  university hospital, timewarner.

    What i feel is that people doing their job, should know what is expected, if they don't know they should learn it form some institute.

    as i mentioned some of the tasks, do require you to be admin, whereas most of the time it is not necessary


    Thursday, February 26, 2009 2:29 AM