locked
What are "certificates" in Windows Azure? RRS feed

  • Question

  • This is 2 questions really:

    Q1) I don't need to be a certified Microsoft developer to deploy on Windows Azure do I?

    Q2) What are the certificates in the Management Portal Hosted Services?

    I code-sign my non-Azure Windows apps, but do I need to do anything like that on Azure?


    http://www.ransen.com Cad and Graphics software

    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:10 AM

Answers

  • "Certificates for hosted or cloud services are the SSL certificates required by your application. They are specific to your application."

    So it is up to me if I use them or not?

    That's correct. For example, if you're buidling a web application which does not require SSL then there's no need for you to use them.

    So "management" in this context means the developer and/or owner of the service hosted on Windows Azure?

    Not really. Essentially all the things you do on the portal is backed by a REST based Service Management API. So if you were to write your own tool to do the same things (like creating a new cloud service for example) or use one of the existing tools (apart from portal) which does these things, you would need a management certificate so that these applications can communicate with the Service Management API.

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Owen Ransen Friday, October 5, 2012 6:53 AM
    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:51 AM

All replies

  • Q1) I don't need to be a certified Microsoft developer to deploy on Windows Azure do I?

    Of course not. As long as you have a valid subscription, you could deploy an application in Windows Azure.

    Q2) What are the certificates in the Management Portal Hosted Services?

    There're two kinds of certificates. One is for hosted services (cloud services) and the other one are management certificates.

    Certificates for hosted or cloud services are the SSL certificates required by your application. They are specific to your application.

    Management certificates are the certificates used for authenticating Service Management API requests (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/ee460782.aspx).

    You can read more about these certificates here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/gg981935.aspx

    Hope this helps.

    • Proposed as answer by Olaf HelperMVP Friday, October 5, 2012 6:42 AM
    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:36 AM
  • "Certificates for hosted or cloud services are the SSL certificates required by your application. They are specific to your application."

    So it is up to me if I use them or not?

    "Management certificates are the certificates used for authenticating Service Management API requests (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/ee460782.aspx)."

    So "management" in this context means the developer and/or owner of the service hosted on Windows Azure?



    http://www.ransen.com Cad and Graphics software

    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:43 AM
  • "Certificates for hosted or cloud services are the SSL certificates required by your application. They are specific to your application."

    So it is up to me if I use them or not?

    That's correct. For example, if you're buidling a web application which does not require SSL then there's no need for you to use them.

    So "management" in this context means the developer and/or owner of the service hosted on Windows Azure?

    Not really. Essentially all the things you do on the portal is backed by a REST based Service Management API. So if you were to write your own tool to do the same things (like creating a new cloud service for example) or use one of the existing tools (apart from portal) which does these things, you would need a management certificate so that these applications can communicate with the Service Management API.

    Hope this helps.

    • Marked as answer by Owen Ransen Friday, October 5, 2012 6:53 AM
    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:51 AM
  • Essentially all the things you do on the portal is backed by a REST based Service Management API. So if you were to write your own tool to do the same things (like creating a new cloud service for example) or use one of the existing tools (apart from portal) which does these things, you would need a management certificate so that these applications can communicate with the Service Management API.


    That is a very clear reply, many thanks.


    http://www.ransen.com Cad and Graphics software

    Friday, October 5, 2012 6:54 AM