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Emulator Image for Samsung Omni Windows 6 phone RRS feed

  • Question

  • I downloaded all the emulator images for Windows 6 and 6.1 but can't find one specific to the Samsung phone.

    It only has two buttons and an optical mouse button on the bottom front of the phone and no other buttons.

    Does anyone know if there is an image available for this phone?

    And if not can I make my own image?

    Thanks.
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:46 PM

Answers

  • There's no Omnia emulator. The emulators are not specific to any phone implementation.  You won't be able to make your own image that operates like the omnia. Also the Omnia contains some hardware and behaviour that you won't be able to get from the emulator.

    If you need to program against omnia specific features your choices are to either use a real omnia or test your code remotly on one of the shared omnia's that Samsung makes publically available (go to http://innovator.samsungmobile.com and look for LAB.Dev). Not that with the remote omnia you have no way of interacting with the accelerometer.
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 1:54 AM
  • Hi,

    You may want to download the Samsung Omnia SDK as detailed below :-

    http://www.samsung-omnia.org/software-development/omnia-sdk/msg28470/

    Hope this helps.

    Paul Diston
    http://www.smartmobiledevice.co.uk/
    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:55 PM
  • I was able to get the Omnia skin and that's about all I need now. I want to see the screen size and where I will put the controls.

    Also, I have a phone to use, and just want to see if I can get one app to work on it. Once I know I can do a simple app, I can start developing seriously. I've done plenty of apps for the Pocket PC.

    Right now the phone rejected my program. I think it's got something to do with security that I haven't figured out yet.

    Since the phone is a Windows device, Microsoft should have an emulator for it. But again, I've sent a lot of programs to a real PPC and know how that works.

    I've been able to find a lot of old stuff for old phones, but not much on the newer ones. I just bought the _Mobile Development Handbook_ but it's huge, a lot to get through.

    I do VB programming, but a lot of the stuff I've found is for C#. I'm not too good at that language. There should always be both languages in the articles being written. MS has a lot of updating to do on the articles in their sites, they go way back to 2003.

    At any rate, thanks for the note on this phone.

    CU
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 11:30 AM
  • I was able to get the Omnia skin and that's about all I need now. I want to see the screen size and where I will put the controls.
    BTW: If you are a new Windows Mobile developer then you may want to look into how you can use Docking and Anchoring to make your program work across multiple resolutions and screen shapes.
    Right now the phone rejected my program. I think it's got something to do with security that I haven't figured out yet.
    Download the "Security Manager Power Toy" to turn off the certificate security on your device. For most samsung devices the default security setting only allows applications signed with specific certificates to run.
    Since the phone is a Windows device, Microsoft should have an emulator for it
    Every Windows Mobile device is a custom device. There have been hundreds if not thousands of Windows Mobile devices made. Microsoft's emulators cover a base functionality set but they don't cover all of the customizations that different OEMs have made to their device. Because of that you won't find an emulator from Microsoft for any specific Windows Mobile device. For most applications the differences in devices don't matter much, so the base emulators are fine. But if you begin using hardware specific features or low level functionality then no emulator will suffice.
    but a lot of the stuff I've found is for C#. I'm not too good at that language. There should always be both languages in the articles being written.
    There are some online translators that may be able to help you out there. But the reality is that a an overwhelming majority of the example programs you find are going to be written in C# (not just the ones from Microsoft).  Learning the language has its advantages. There are several other C derived languages (JavaScript, Java, C,C++, Objective-C) and learning one of them will make reading code in another much easier.
    MS has a lot of updating to do on the articles in their sites, they go way back to 2003.
    I don't think any one is going to update those articles. In current form many of them still have applicability, so they don't really need updating. For articles that have slipped into obsolescence they'll probably stick around for those that need to reference older implementations before they drop off completly.
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 11:51 AM
  • Thanks for the info.

    I downloaded the "Security Manager Power Toy" and used it to turn off the security in my phone. The first time I tried, the phone didn't like it. I then saved my phone's current settings, then did it again and it worked.

    I then deployed my app to the phone and "Hello World" worked. Yea.

    Sorry, I'm 66 years old and have no room in my head for C# or any of its mothers, fathers, brothers or sisters. I will only do Basic. I do use a couple translators, but then I have to work a lot to get the code into the article I'm reading.

    I only want to put some of my own apps on my phone and don't think I want to go through the hastle of selling or maintaining apps to the general public. Unless, of course it could pay for my retirement.

    Maybe I'll start writing a simple book, or maybe articles on writing mobile device programs, so the young people can understand it and do it for themselves and maybe make a living.

    CU

    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:30 PM

  • Sorry, I'm 66 years old and have no room in my head for C# or any of its mothers, fathers, brothers or sisters. I will only do Basic. I do use a couple translators, but then I have to work a lot to get the code into the article I'm reading.

    LOL, Nice wording!
    Maybe I'll start writing a simple book, or maybe articles on writing mobile device programs, so the young people can understand it and do it for themselves and maybe make a living.

    CU


    Sounds ike a good idea! I'd encourage you to publish your articles at CodeProject.com (that's here I tend to publish my articles).
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:34 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    You may want to download the Samsung Omnia SDK as detailed below :-

    http://www.samsung-omnia.org/software-development/omnia-sdk/msg28470/

    Hope this helps.

    Paul Diston
    http://www.smartmobiledevice.co.uk/
    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009 6:55 PM
  • Thanks, Paul, that link was very helpful.

    CU
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009 11:36 AM
  • There's no Omnia emulator. The emulators are not specific to any phone implementation.  You won't be able to make your own image that operates like the omnia. Also the Omnia contains some hardware and behaviour that you won't be able to get from the emulator.

    If you need to program against omnia specific features your choices are to either use a real omnia or test your code remotly on one of the shared omnia's that Samsung makes publically available (go to http://innovator.samsungmobile.com and look for LAB.Dev). Not that with the remote omnia you have no way of interacting with the accelerometer.
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 1:54 AM
  • I was able to get the Omnia skin and that's about all I need now. I want to see the screen size and where I will put the controls.

    Also, I have a phone to use, and just want to see if I can get one app to work on it. Once I know I can do a simple app, I can start developing seriously. I've done plenty of apps for the Pocket PC.

    Right now the phone rejected my program. I think it's got something to do with security that I haven't figured out yet.

    Since the phone is a Windows device, Microsoft should have an emulator for it. But again, I've sent a lot of programs to a real PPC and know how that works.

    I've been able to find a lot of old stuff for old phones, but not much on the newer ones. I just bought the _Mobile Development Handbook_ but it's huge, a lot to get through.

    I do VB programming, but a lot of the stuff I've found is for C#. I'm not too good at that language. There should always be both languages in the articles being written. MS has a lot of updating to do on the articles in their sites, they go way back to 2003.

    At any rate, thanks for the note on this phone.

    CU
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 11:30 AM
  • I was able to get the Omnia skin and that's about all I need now. I want to see the screen size and where I will put the controls.
    BTW: If you are a new Windows Mobile developer then you may want to look into how you can use Docking and Anchoring to make your program work across multiple resolutions and screen shapes.
    Right now the phone rejected my program. I think it's got something to do with security that I haven't figured out yet.
    Download the "Security Manager Power Toy" to turn off the certificate security on your device. For most samsung devices the default security setting only allows applications signed with specific certificates to run.
    Since the phone is a Windows device, Microsoft should have an emulator for it
    Every Windows Mobile device is a custom device. There have been hundreds if not thousands of Windows Mobile devices made. Microsoft's emulators cover a base functionality set but they don't cover all of the customizations that different OEMs have made to their device. Because of that you won't find an emulator from Microsoft for any specific Windows Mobile device. For most applications the differences in devices don't matter much, so the base emulators are fine. But if you begin using hardware specific features or low level functionality then no emulator will suffice.
    but a lot of the stuff I've found is for C#. I'm not too good at that language. There should always be both languages in the articles being written.
    There are some online translators that may be able to help you out there. But the reality is that a an overwhelming majority of the example programs you find are going to be written in C# (not just the ones from Microsoft).  Learning the language has its advantages. There are several other C derived languages (JavaScript, Java, C,C++, Objective-C) and learning one of them will make reading code in another much easier.
    MS has a lot of updating to do on the articles in their sites, they go way back to 2003.
    I don't think any one is going to update those articles. In current form many of them still have applicability, so they don't really need updating. For articles that have slipped into obsolescence they'll probably stick around for those that need to reference older implementations before they drop off completly.
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 11:51 AM
  • Thanks for the info.

    I downloaded the "Security Manager Power Toy" and used it to turn off the security in my phone. The first time I tried, the phone didn't like it. I then saved my phone's current settings, then did it again and it worked.

    I then deployed my app to the phone and "Hello World" worked. Yea.

    Sorry, I'm 66 years old and have no room in my head for C# or any of its mothers, fathers, brothers or sisters. I will only do Basic. I do use a couple translators, but then I have to work a lot to get the code into the article I'm reading.

    I only want to put some of my own apps on my phone and don't think I want to go through the hastle of selling or maintaining apps to the general public. Unless, of course it could pay for my retirement.

    Maybe I'll start writing a simple book, or maybe articles on writing mobile device programs, so the young people can understand it and do it for themselves and maybe make a living.

    CU

    • Marked as answer by ZHE ZHAO Tuesday, September 22, 2009 1:55 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:30 PM

  • Sorry, I'm 66 years old and have no room in my head for C# or any of its mothers, fathers, brothers or sisters. I will only do Basic. I do use a couple translators, but then I have to work a lot to get the code into the article I'm reading.

    LOL, Nice wording!
    Maybe I'll start writing a simple book, or maybe articles on writing mobile device programs, so the young people can understand it and do it for themselves and maybe make a living.

    CU


    Sounds ike a good idea! I'd encourage you to publish your articles at CodeProject.com (that's here I tend to publish my articles).
    Joel Ivory Johnson
    • Marked as answer by Tony Scarpelli Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:10 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2009 5:34 PM