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Moving to Office 2003 RRS feed

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  • Started by choleechee at 03-10-2005 9:38 AM. Topic has 3 replies.


    choleechee is not online. Last active: 3/10/2005 3:37:34 PM choleechee

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    Moving to Office 2003
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    The high schol I teach at is considering an update to Office 2003 for the start of the 2005-2006 school year (sometime in August). I teach the Office Suite and three different computer language classes.

    My question is: does the Visual Basic for Applications in Office 2003 support (or use) VB 6 or Visual Basic .NET? My assumption is that if Office 2003 uses Visual Basic .NET, I will need to modify the computer language classes and begin teaching Visual Basic .NET.

    Another assumption I have is that I should also begin teaching C# instead of C++. Please advise - thank you!


































    03-14-2005, 10:10 AM
    admin is not online. Last active: 3/24/2005 4:50:20 PM admin

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    Re: Moving to Office 2003
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    Yes, the Office 2003 suite is Visual Basic for Applications or VBA (it’s kinda “VB6 light”). There is a free and supported download to add .NET functionality to Office called Visual Studio Tools for Office or VSTO but it’s simply a COM wrapper and “your mileage will vary”. In Office 12, we should have full .NET support.



















    03-24-2005, 4:05 AM
    Howard is not online. Last active: 3/24/2005 9:53:57 AM Howard

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    I would suggest teaching .NET compatible languages anyway, as that is what is going to be used in the future.














    KenGetz is not online. Last active: 4/7/2005 9:25:23 PM KenGetz

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    Re: Moving to Office 2003
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    I'm really not quite sure what "VB6 light" means -- the version of VBA that's in VB6 is exactly, byte-for-byte, the same version of VBA that's in VB6. So the languages are exactly the same. VB6 provides some design-time features that aren't there in Office, but one could hardly argue that Office doesn't provide its own set of design-time features (rich documents in Word, full spreadsheet support in Excel, and so on) that VB6 doesn't have. So I want to clarify: VB6 is just targeting a different audience than VBA in Office, but the languages are identical. (Please do let me know if I'm wrong, but I don't know of any language feature that isn't the same in both. The distinction between language features and product features are hard to discern, I know, but it's not like in Office 97/VB5 days, in which the version of VBA in Office WAS an earlier version than what appeared in VB5. In VB6/Office 2000 and later, however, the languages are the same.)

    In addition, I'm not sure what "we should have full .NET support" means, but I can almost guarantee (not working at Microsoft, I could always be wrong, but I'm pretty darned sure of this one) that Office WILL NOT have "full support" of .NET (which implies that some .NET language will replace or supplant VBA). Not so. I'm sure VSTO and its managed support for Office objects will expand in Office 12, but I really can guarantee that unless something totally bizarre happens, VBA will still be supported in Office 12. -- Ken


    Wednesday, May 18, 2005 9:47 PM

Answers

  • This thread was migrated from previous MSDN ISV forum.
    Monday, May 23, 2005 7:50 PM

All replies

  • This thread was migrated from previous MSDN ISV forum.
    Monday, May 23, 2005 7:50 PM
  • As far as C++/C# goes, I would certianly recommend teaching a language that runs managed code (any that runs in CLR in .Net).  C# is particularly good, however, because the syntax is closely related to C++ so it gives them the possibility of learning C++ later on more easily if they would like to.
    Wednesday, August 3, 2005 9:43 PM