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Visual Studio for Non-Walled Garden Rich Internet Applications

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  • My question is this: will there be a product in the Visual Studio family that deploys pure HTML5+JavaScript RIAs but also leverages the power of the XAML/.Net and Windows Server(s) platform?

    I am about to embark on a huge development effort.  Ideally, the deployment model for the RIA user-facing elements will be "write-once/run-anywhere/without-plugins." The code base for the back-end will be a combination of Microsoft's server technologies (SQL Server et alia).  Oh, and did I mention that it needs to be able to be at least minimally integrated with customer portals (esp SharePoint)?

    I would really love to be able to leverage the XAML/.Net language stack as well. 

    Because the major vendors (esp Apple) have been moving away from a plug-in model, our choices for the user-facing elements of our project are reduced.  We either develop a separate version of our product (or at the very least the RIA parts of it) for each walled garden or we go with the lowest-common-denominator technology, which appears to HTML5+JavaScript.

    Either choice is going to cost us dearly in terms of time and money.  I'm just hoping the smart folks at Microsoft understand that and are planning to include something in the Visual Studio family of products that will minimize the hit to our productivity and pocket books.

    Any thoughts?

    Sunday, October 09, 2011 8:53 AM

Answers

  • Hi Orange Crush,

    Pure JavaScript +HTML5 applications need some sort of execution container; on Windows 7, that container is still the browser.  On Windows 8, there are two containers:  the browser and wwahost.exe for JS+HTML5 metro-style applications.  You can also develop RIAs in Silverlight, but this is C# and VB, not JS+HTML.  Silverlight can run in browser or out of browser, but not as a metro-style application.

    Note that XAML and HTML+CSS serve the same basic purpose of providing UI markup.  You use XAML with C++, C#, and VB, but you use HTML+CSS with JS.  You wouldn't use XAML with JS and you wouldn't use HTML+CSS with C++, C# and VB.

    When you design a metro-style application in JS+HTML with Visual Studio, you do get a full development environment, debugger, ability to call Windows Runtime functions, etc.

    Hopefully this info will help you understand the range of options.

    Sincerely,

    Dan

    Thursday, October 13, 2011 8:08 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hello Orange Crush,

     

    This thread was created in the Windows Developer Preview: General OS questions forum; the Microsoft Moderation team has moved this thread to the Tools for Metro style apps forum.


    Steven
    Monday, October 10, 2011 9:33 PM
  • Hello Orange Crush,

     

    This thread was created in the Windows Developer Preview: General OS questions forum; the Microsoft Moderation team has moved this thread to the Tools for Metro style apps forum.


    Steven

    Thank you, Steven.  It's always a little confusing figuring out where to post.
    Thursday, October 13, 2011 1:48 PM
  • Hi Orange Crush,

    Pure JavaScript +HTML5 applications need some sort of execution container; on Windows 7, that container is still the browser.  On Windows 8, there are two containers:  the browser and wwahost.exe for JS+HTML5 metro-style applications.  You can also develop RIAs in Silverlight, but this is C# and VB, not JS+HTML.  Silverlight can run in browser or out of browser, but not as a metro-style application.

    Note that XAML and HTML+CSS serve the same basic purpose of providing UI markup.  You use XAML with C++, C#, and VB, but you use HTML+CSS with JS.  You wouldn't use XAML with JS and you wouldn't use HTML+CSS with C++, C# and VB.

    When you design a metro-style application in JS+HTML with Visual Studio, you do get a full development environment, debugger, ability to call Windows Runtime functions, etc.

    Hopefully this info will help you understand the range of options.

    Sincerely,

    Dan

    Thursday, October 13, 2011 8:08 PM
    Moderator