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Why are SSIS project files (DTPROJ) so huge, and so prone to being corrupted by TFS?

    Question

  • We have a VS 2015 SSIS project with a number of packages and multiple developers.  TFS occasionally mangles a merge, leaving packages omitted or even producing a DTPROJ file that won't load, forcing us to revert to an older one.  We then have to add missing packages back.  It is to the point that I make a backup of the project file before any check in or check out.

    My DTPROJ file is over 80,000 lines and all but a few hundred are within the <SSIS:DeploymentInfo> element.

    Why is so much information about individual packages stored in the project file, and how can I reduce the rate of errors during checkin/checkout?  Also, is there any way to get it to not check packages out until I actually modify them?  Having everything I looked at show up in the Pending Changes dialog isn't as big an issue as project file corruption but it's still a bit disconcerting when I've made no changes.  Can also cause issues if someone eles actually saved an edit while I was viewing the file.


    Russell

    Tuesday, March 6, 2018 6:35 PM

All replies

  • We have a VS 2015 SSIS project with a number of packages and multiple developers.  TFS occasionally mangles a merge, leaving packages omitted or even producing a DTPROJ file that won't load, forcing us to revert to an older one.  We then have to add missing packages back.  It is to the point that I make a backup of the project file before any check in or check out.

    My DTPROJ file is over 80,000 lines and all but a few hundred are within the <SSIS:DeploymentInfo> element.

    Why is so much information about individual packages stored in the project file, and how can I reduce the rate of errors during checkin/checkout?  Also, is there any way to get it to not check packages out until I actually modify them?  Having everything I looked at show up in the Pending Changes dialog isn't as big an issue as project file corruption but it's still a bit disconcerting when I've made no changes.  Can also cause issues if someone eles actually saved an edit while I was viewing the file.


    Russell

    This needs an answer - it is ridiculous that there is no straightforward method to merge or at least edit dtproj files when they no longer include the right packages.  Rebuild of this type of problem is making me want to ditch SSIS altogether as a tool.

    Friday, June 15, 2018 12:53 PM